You don't need eyes to see, you need vision: performative pedagogy, technology and teaching art to students with vision impairment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622377
Title:
You don't need eyes to see, you need vision: performative pedagogy, technology and teaching art to students with vision impairment
Authors:
Campbell, Lee
Abstract:
This paper links experiential learning and Performance Art with public pedagogy on sight/visual negation and contributes to knowledge by drawing together performance as pedagogy to demonstrate how teaching styles can accommodate those with vision impairment and adapt (performance) art to make it more accessible. In so doing it seeks to develop inclusion for students with a vision impairment. Intermeshing practice, teaching and research around issues of access, participation and education, it builds upon previous work exploring teaching strategies for the visually impaired within contemporary art practice (Axel and Levent, 2003; Hayhoe, 2008; Allan, 2014) and shares useful adaptations to help make learning about art more accessible for students with vision impairment. It also sheds light upon aspects of the question, ‘What are the basics that an educator needs to know when designing art programs for persons with visual impairment?’ (Axel and Levent, 2003: 51). This paper can be read as a benchmark for critical engagement in its attempt to combine performative pedagogy with an emphasis on technological means, access and visual impairment. While vision is favoured over other senses (Jonas, 1954) and with the increasing importance of digital and virtual realities as a major component of students’ lives, never has there been a time in which the meanings of access are so broadened via technological mediation—that draw on all senses—to which artworks, as suggested, respond. Relying on all senses becomes an aspect of public pedagogy that is more inclusive.
Affiliation:
University of Lincoln
Citation:
Campbell, L. (2017) 'You don't need eyes to see, you need vision: performative pedagogy, technology and teaching art to students with vision impairment'. Journal of pedagogic development 7 (3)
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
1-Nov-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622377
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/397/594
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, Leeen
dc.date.accessioned2017-11-10T14:13:59Z-
dc.date.available2017-11-10T14:13:59Z-
dc.date.issued2017-11-01-
dc.identifier.citationCampbell, L. (2017) 'You don't need eyes to see, you need vision: performative pedagogy, technology and teaching art to students with vision impairment'. Journal of pedagogic development 7 (3)en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622377-
dc.description.abstractThis paper links experiential learning and Performance Art with public pedagogy on sight/visual negation and contributes to knowledge by drawing together performance as pedagogy to demonstrate how teaching styles can accommodate those with vision impairment and adapt (performance) art to make it more accessible. In so doing it seeks to develop inclusion for students with a vision impairment. Intermeshing practice, teaching and research around issues of access, participation and education, it builds upon previous work exploring teaching strategies for the visually impaired within contemporary art practice (Axel and Levent, 2003; Hayhoe, 2008; Allan, 2014) and shares useful adaptations to help make learning about art more accessible for students with vision impairment. It also sheds light upon aspects of the question, ‘What are the basics that an educator needs to know when designing art programs for persons with visual impairment?’ (Axel and Levent, 2003: 51). This paper can be read as a benchmark for critical engagement in its attempt to combine performative pedagogy with an emphasis on technological means, access and visual impairment. While vision is favoured over other senses (Jonas, 1954) and with the increasing importance of digital and virtual realities as a major component of students’ lives, never has there been a time in which the meanings of access are so broadened via technological mediation—that draw on all senses—to which artworks, as suggested, respond. Relying on all senses becomes an aspect of public pedagogy that is more inclusive.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/397/594en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectaccessen
dc.subjectexperiential learningen
dc.subjecthapticen
dc.subjectinclusionen
dc.subjectoccularcentritcityen
dc.subjectparticipationen
dc.subjectperformance arten
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.subjectpedagogyen
dc.titleYou don't need eyes to see, you need vision: performative pedagogy, technology and teaching art to students with vision impairmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Lincolnen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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