Exercise epigenetics and the foetal origins of disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622316
Title:
Exercise epigenetics and the foetal origins of disease
Authors:
Chalk, Thomas E.W.; Brown, William Michael ( 0000-0001-6875-4296 )
Abstract:
Exercise epigenetics is a nascent area of research with vast health implications (e.g., from the treatment of obesity-related diseases to beneficially decoupling epigenetic and chronological age). Evidence is accumulating [1] that exercise can acutely modify the epigenome (e.g., via DNA methylation) for short-term regulatory purposes (e.g., mRNA expression). More speculatively perhaps, maternal exercise during the pre and post–partum period could cause epigenetic changes in offspring. It is generally believed that there are benefits of regular moderate exercise during pregnancy [2]. The phenotypic benefits of maternal exercise notwithstanding, exercise can be viewed as a type of organismal stressor [1]. There are a myriad of ways in which environmental perturbations can affect foetal development. For example gestational stress could alter the epigenome and subsequent physical development. We suggest that maternal exercise -- like most gestational stressors -- will have a dose-response relationship on an offspring’s epigenome (i.e., negative effects at high doses), akin to the phenomenon of hormesis. Interestingly there is no research investigating the epigenetic effects of maternal exercise in humans. This editorial is a call for research on the subject.
Citation:
Chalk T, Brown, W (2014) 'Exercise epigenetics and the foetal origins of disease', Epigenomics, 6 (5), pp.469-472.
Publisher:
Future Medicine
Journal:
Epigenomics
Issue Date:
28-Nov-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622316
DOI:
10.2217/epi.14.38
PubMed ID:
25431939
Additional Links:
https://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/abs/10.2217/epi.14.38
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1750-1911
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChalk, Thomas E.W.en
dc.contributor.authorBrown, William Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-24T13:07:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-24T13:07:02Z-
dc.date.issued2014-11-28-
dc.identifier.citationChalk T, Brown, W (2014) 'Exercise epigenetics and the foetal origins of disease', Epigenomics, 6 (5), pp.469-472.en
dc.identifier.issn1750-1911-
dc.identifier.pmid25431939-
dc.identifier.doi10.2217/epi.14.38-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622316-
dc.description.abstractExercise epigenetics is a nascent area of research with vast health implications (e.g., from the treatment of obesity-related diseases to beneficially decoupling epigenetic and chronological age). Evidence is accumulating [1] that exercise can acutely modify the epigenome (e.g., via DNA methylation) for short-term regulatory purposes (e.g., mRNA expression). More speculatively perhaps, maternal exercise during the pre and post–partum period could cause epigenetic changes in offspring. It is generally believed that there are benefits of regular moderate exercise during pregnancy [2]. The phenotypic benefits of maternal exercise notwithstanding, exercise can be viewed as a type of organismal stressor [1]. There are a myriad of ways in which environmental perturbations can affect foetal development. For example gestational stress could alter the epigenome and subsequent physical development. We suggest that maternal exercise -- like most gestational stressors -- will have a dose-response relationship on an offspring’s epigenome (i.e., negative effects at high doses), akin to the phenomenon of hormesis. Interestingly there is no research investigating the epigenetic effects of maternal exercise in humans. This editorial is a call for research on the subject.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFuture Medicineen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.futuremedicine.com/doi/abs/10.2217/epi.14.38en
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectepigeneticsen
dc.subjectC400 Geneticsen
dc.titleExercise epigenetics and the foetal origins of diseaseen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEpigenomicsen
dc.date.updated2017-10-24T11:28:55Z-

Related articles on PubMed

This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.