Beliefs about medicines and non-adherence in patients with stroke, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study in China

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622311
Title:
Beliefs about medicines and non-adherence in patients with stroke, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study in China
Authors:
Wei, Li; Champman, Sarah; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Xin; Li, Sumei; Chen, Ruoling; Bo, Nie; Chater, Angel M. ( 0000-0002-9043-2565 ) ; Horne, Robert
Abstract:
OBJECTIVES: To investigate beliefs about medicines and their association with medicine adherence in patients with chronic diseases in China. DESIGN: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study SETTING: Two large urban hospitals in Hefei and Tianjin, China PARTICIPANTS: Hospital inpatients (313 stroke patients) and outpatients (315 diabetic patients and 339 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients) were recruited between January 2014 and September 2014. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), assessing patients' beliefs about the specific medicine (Specific-Necessity and Specific-Concerns) prescribed for their conditions (stroke/diabetes/RA) and more general background beliefs about pharmaceuticals as a class of treatment (BMQ-General Benefit, Harm and Overuse); the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines scale (PSM) assessed patients' beliefs about how sensitive they were to the effects of medicines and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. The association between non-adherence and beliefs about medicines was assessed using a logistic regression model. RESULTS: Patients with diabetes mellitus had a stronger perceived need for treatment (mean (SD) Specific-Necessity score, 3.75 (0.40)) than patients with stroke (3.69 (0.53)) and RA (3.66 (0.44)) (p=0.049). Moderate correlations were observed between Specific-Concerns and General-Overuse, General-Harm and PSM (Pearson correlation coefficients, 0.39, 0.49 and 0.49, respectively, p<0.01). Three hundred and eleven patients were non-adherent to their medicine (159 (51.0%) in the stroke group, 60 (26.7%) in the diabetes mellitus group and 62 (19.8%) in the RA group, p<0.01). Across the whole sample, after adjusting for demographic characteristics, non-adherence was associated with patients who had higher concerns about their medicines (OR, 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71) and patients who believed that they were personally sensitive to the effects of medications (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.85). CONCLUSION: The BMQ is a useful tool to identify patients at risk of non-adherence. In the future, adherence intervention studies may use the BMQ to screen for patients who are at risk of non-adherence and to map interventional support.
Affiliation:
University College London School of Pharmacy; University of Bath; Anhui Medical University; Tianjin Medical University; University of Wolverhampton; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Wei L., Champman S., Li X., Li X., Li S., Chen R., Bo N., Chater A., Horne R. (2017) 'Beliefs about medicines and non-adherence in patients with stroke, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study in China', BMJ Open, 7 (10).
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Journal:
BMJ Open
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622311
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017293
PubMed ID:
28982826
PubMed Central ID:
PMC5640055
Additional Links:
http://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/10/e017293
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2044-6055
Appears in Collections:
Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWei, Lien
dc.contributor.authorChampman, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xiaomeien
dc.contributor.authorLi, Xinen
dc.contributor.authorLi, Sumeien
dc.contributor.authorChen, Ruolingen
dc.contributor.authorBo, Nieen
dc.contributor.authorChater, Angel M.en
dc.contributor.authorHorne, Roberten
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-24T13:06:37Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-24T13:06:37Z-
dc.date.issued2017-10-01-
dc.identifier.citationWei L., Champman S., Li X., Li X., Li S., Chen R., Bo N., Chater A., Horne R. (2017) 'Beliefs about medicines and non-adherence in patients with stroke, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study in China', BMJ Open, 7 (10).en
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055-
dc.identifier.pmid28982826-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2017-017293-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622311-
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVES: To investigate beliefs about medicines and their association with medicine adherence in patients with chronic diseases in China. DESIGN: A cross-sectional questionnaire-based study SETTING: Two large urban hospitals in Hefei and Tianjin, China PARTICIPANTS: Hospital inpatients (313 stroke patients) and outpatients (315 diabetic patients and 339 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients) were recruited between January 2014 and September 2014. OUTCOME MEASURES: The Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ), assessing patients' beliefs about the specific medicine (Specific-Necessity and Specific-Concerns) prescribed for their conditions (stroke/diabetes/RA) and more general background beliefs about pharmaceuticals as a class of treatment (BMQ-General Benefit, Harm and Overuse); the Perceived Sensitivity to Medicines scale (PSM) assessed patients' beliefs about how sensitive they were to the effects of medicines and the Medication Adherence Report Scale. The association between non-adherence and beliefs about medicines was assessed using a logistic regression model. RESULTS: Patients with diabetes mellitus had a stronger perceived need for treatment (mean (SD) Specific-Necessity score, 3.75 (0.40)) than patients with stroke (3.69 (0.53)) and RA (3.66 (0.44)) (p=0.049). Moderate correlations were observed between Specific-Concerns and General-Overuse, General-Harm and PSM (Pearson correlation coefficients, 0.39, 0.49 and 0.49, respectively, p<0.01). Three hundred and eleven patients were non-adherent to their medicine (159 (51.0%) in the stroke group, 60 (26.7%) in the diabetes mellitus group and 62 (19.8%) in the RA group, p<0.01). Across the whole sample, after adjusting for demographic characteristics, non-adherence was associated with patients who had higher concerns about their medicines (OR, 1.35, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.71) and patients who believed that they were personally sensitive to the effects of medications (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.85). CONCLUSION: The BMQ is a useful tool to identify patients at risk of non-adherence. In the future, adherence intervention studies may use the BMQ to screen for patients who are at risk of non-adherence and to map interventional support.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/7/10/e017293en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectbeliefs about medicinesen
dc.subjectchronic diseasesen
dc.subjectmedicine non-adherenceen
dc.subjectdiabetes mellitusen
dc.subjectstrokeen
dc.subjectrheumatoid arthritisen
dc.subjectC841 Health Psychologyen
dc.titleBeliefs about medicines and non-adherence in patients with stroke, diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis: a cross-sectional study in Chinaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College London School of Pharmacyen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bathen
dc.contributor.departmentAnhui Medical Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentTianjin Medical Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Wolverhamptonen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC5640055-
dc.date.updated2017-10-24T11:29:01Z-
dc.description.noteopen access-

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