Patients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622307
Title:
Patients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care
Authors:
Chapman, S.C.E.; Horne, Robert; Chater, Angel M. ( 0000-0002-9043-2565 ) ; Hukins, D.; Smithson, W.H.
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can result in suboptimal outcomes for patients. AIM: This study aimed to assess the utility of a theory-based approach to understanding patient perspectives on AEDs and adherence. METHOD: Patients with epilepsy, identified by a GP case note review, were mailed validated questionnaires assessing their perceptions of AEDs and their adherence to them. RESULTS: Most (84.9%) of the 398 AED-treated respondents accepted the necessity of AEDs, but over half expressed doubts, with 55% disagreeing or uncertain about the statement 'I would prefer to take epilepsy medication than risk a seizure'. Over a third (36.4%) expressed strong concerns about the potential negative effects of AEDs. We used self-report and medication possession ratio to classify 36.4% of patients as nonadherent. Nonadherence was related to beliefs about medicines and implicit attitudes toward AEDs (p<0.05). Adherence-related attitudes toward AEDs were correlated with general beliefs about pharmaceuticals (BMQ General: General Harm, General Overuse, and General Benefit scales) and perceptions of personal sensitivity to medicines (PSM scale). CONCLUSION: We identified salient, adherence-related beliefs about AEDs. Patient-centered interventions to support medicine optimization for people with epilepsy should take account of these beliefs.
Affiliation:
University College London School of Pharmacy; Northern General Hospital, Sheffield; St John's University, York
Citation:
Chapman S., Horne R., Chater A., Hukins D., Smithson W. (2014) 'Patients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care', Epilepsy and Behavior, 31, pp.312-320.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Epilepsy and Behavior
Issue Date:
14-Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622307
DOI:
10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.10.016
PubMed ID:
24290250
Additional Links:
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525505013005490?via=ihub
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1525-5050
Appears in Collections:
Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChapman, S.C.E.en
dc.contributor.authorHorne, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorChater, Angel M.en
dc.contributor.authorHukins, D.en
dc.contributor.authorSmithson, W.H.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-24T13:06:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-24T13:06:15Z-
dc.date.issued2014-02-14-
dc.identifier.citationChapman S., Horne R., Chater A., Hukins D., Smithson W. (2014) 'Patients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary care', Epilepsy and Behavior, 31, pp.312-320.en
dc.identifier.issn1525-5050-
dc.identifier.pmid24290250-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.yebeh.2013.10.016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622307-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Nonadherence to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) can result in suboptimal outcomes for patients. AIM: This study aimed to assess the utility of a theory-based approach to understanding patient perspectives on AEDs and adherence. METHOD: Patients with epilepsy, identified by a GP case note review, were mailed validated questionnaires assessing their perceptions of AEDs and their adherence to them. RESULTS: Most (84.9%) of the 398 AED-treated respondents accepted the necessity of AEDs, but over half expressed doubts, with 55% disagreeing or uncertain about the statement 'I would prefer to take epilepsy medication than risk a seizure'. Over a third (36.4%) expressed strong concerns about the potential negative effects of AEDs. We used self-report and medication possession ratio to classify 36.4% of patients as nonadherent. Nonadherence was related to beliefs about medicines and implicit attitudes toward AEDs (p<0.05). Adherence-related attitudes toward AEDs were correlated with general beliefs about pharmaceuticals (BMQ General: General Harm, General Overuse, and General Benefit scales) and perceptions of personal sensitivity to medicines (PSM scale). CONCLUSION: We identified salient, adherence-related beliefs about AEDs. Patient-centered interventions to support medicine optimization for people with epilepsy should take account of these beliefs.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1525505013005490?via=ihuben
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectPerceived Sensitivity to Medicines (PSM) scaleen
dc.subjectprimary careen
dc.subjectepilepsyen
dc.subjectBeliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ)en
dc.subjectantiepileptic drugsen
dc.subjectmedicine adherenceen
dc.subjectpatient experienceen
dc.subjectC841 Health Psychologyen
dc.titlePatients' perspectives on antiepileptic medication: relationships between beliefs about medicines and adherence among patients with epilepsy in UK primary careen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College London School of Pharmacyen
dc.contributor.departmentNorthern General Hospital, Sheffielden
dc.contributor.departmentSt John's University, Yorken
dc.identifier.journalEpilepsy and Behavioren
dc.date.updated2017-10-24T11:29:06Z-
dc.description.noteopen access-

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