2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622288
Title:
Carolingian Domesticities
Authors:
Stone, Rachel ( 0000-0002-6966-7503 ) ; Bennett, Judith; Karras, Ruth Mazo
Other Titles:
The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe
Abstract:
Carolingian ideas of "home" and "family" encompassed a wide range of meanings from physical buildings to kin and free and unfree dependents. Kinship ties played a vital role, both socially and politically, and marriage practices reflected that; Carolingian reforms respected parents' strategies concerning their children's marriages. The Frankish economy was structured around nuclear households, from peasant tenancies to the huge estates presided over by noble men and women. Male and female activities in both production and consumption were partially, but not completely gender-specific. Dowries provided some economic independence for women, but female wealth often depended on contingent factors such as family size and the attitudes of male relatives. The ordered conjugal household was an important image in Carolingian moral thought, with married women holding a subordinate, but honored position. Frankish ideology focused more on elite women's role in the management of dependents and social networks than on purely "housewifely" activities.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire; University of Southern California; University of Minnesota
Citation:
Stone R (2013) 'Carolingian Domesticities', in Bennett J, Karras RM (ed(s).). The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe: Oxford University Press.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622288
DOI:
10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.013.004
Additional Links:
http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199582174-e-004DO - 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.013.004
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9780199582174
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStone, Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorBennett, Judithen
dc.contributor.authorKarras, Ruth Mazoen
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-17T11:57:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-10-17T11:57:26Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationStone R (2013) 'Carolingian Domesticities', in Bennett J, Karras RM (ed(s).). The Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europe: Oxford University Press.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780199582174-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.013.004-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622288-
dc.description.abstractCarolingian ideas of "home" and "family" encompassed a wide range of meanings from physical buildings to kin and free and unfree dependents. Kinship ties played a vital role, both socially and politically, and marriage practices reflected that; Carolingian reforms respected parents' strategies concerning their children's marriages. The Frankish economy was structured around nuclear households, from peasant tenancies to the huge estates presided over by noble men and women. Male and female activities in both production and consumption were partially, but not completely gender-specific. Dowries provided some economic independence for women, but female wealth often depended on contingent factors such as family size and the attitudes of male relatives. The ordered conjugal household was an important image in Carolingian moral thought, with married women holding a subordinate, but honored position. Frankish ideology focused more on elite women's role in the management of dependents and social networks than on purely "housewifely" activities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780199582174-e-004DO - 10.1093/oxfordhb/9780199582174.013.004en
dc.subjecthistoryen
dc.subjectmedievalen
dc.titleCarolingian Domesticitiesen
dc.title.alternativeThe Oxford Handbook of Women and Gender in Medieval Europeen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Southern Californiaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Minnesotaen
dc.date.updated2017-10-12T23:18:03Z-
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