Analgesic effects of self-chosen music type on cold pressor-induced pain: Motivating vs. relaxing music

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622242
Title:
Analgesic effects of self-chosen music type on cold pressor-induced pain: Motivating vs. relaxing music
Authors:
Garcia, Rebecca ( 0000-0002-2070-094X ) ; Hand, Christopher J.
Abstract:
The attenuation of perceived pain through exposure to music is known as music analgesia. The present study used a mixed-methods design, investigating whether self-chosen music moderated participants' psychological and physiological responses to pain during cold pressor (CP) tasks. Thirty participants took part (14 males, 16 females; M-age = 27.77 years). Three levels of musical stimulation were employedrelaxing music, motivating music and a silent control condition. Dependent variables included: CP tolerance time, Profile of Mood score, visual analogue pain ratingintensity and unpleasantness (VAS-I & VAS-U), blood pressure and pulse rate. Qualitative semi-structured interviews further investigated perceived differences between musical stimulation types. Results demonstrated a significant effect of musical exposure on VAS-U scores [F (2, 56) = 3.60, p = .034]. Pairwise comparisons revealed that VAS-U scores were significantly lower after exposure to relaxing music than after silence. Qualitative analyses of interview transcripts revealed dominant themes of distraction, absorption and context-dependent memory induction, with the most-preferred condition being motivational music. Results of the current study suggest that active listening to music reduces pain unpleasantness ratings, and that individual preference is an important determinant of the overall emotional and distraction properties of musical stimuli.
Affiliation:
Glasgow Caledonian University; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Garcia RL, Hand CJ (2015) 'Analgesic effects of self-chosen music type on cold pressor-induced pain: Motivating vs. relaxing music', Psychology of Music, 44, pp.967-983.
Publisher:
Sage Publications
Journal:
Psychology of Music
Issue Date:
7-Sep-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622242
DOI:
10.1177/0305735615602144
Additional Links:
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0305735615602144
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0305-7356
Sponsors:
none
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGarcia, Rebeccaen
dc.contributor.authorHand, Christopher J.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-27T13:24:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-27T13:24:29Z-
dc.date.issued2015-09-07-
dc.identifier.citationGarcia RL, Hand CJ (2015) 'Analgesic effects of self-chosen music type on cold pressor-induced pain: Motivating vs. relaxing music', Psychology of Music, 44, pp.967-983.en
dc.identifier.issn0305-7356-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0305735615602144-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622242-
dc.description.abstractThe attenuation of perceived pain through exposure to music is known as music analgesia. The present study used a mixed-methods design, investigating whether self-chosen music moderated participants' psychological and physiological responses to pain during cold pressor (CP) tasks. Thirty participants took part (14 males, 16 females; M-age = 27.77 years). Three levels of musical stimulation were employedrelaxing music, motivating music and a silent control condition. Dependent variables included: CP tolerance time, Profile of Mood score, visual analogue pain ratingintensity and unpleasantness (VAS-I & VAS-U), blood pressure and pulse rate. Qualitative semi-structured interviews further investigated perceived differences between musical stimulation types. Results demonstrated a significant effect of musical exposure on VAS-U scores [F (2, 56) = 3.60, p = .034]. Pairwise comparisons revealed that VAS-U scores were significantly lower after exposure to relaxing music than after silence. Qualitative analyses of interview transcripts revealed dominant themes of distraction, absorption and context-dependent memory induction, with the most-preferred condition being motivational music. Results of the current study suggest that active listening to music reduces pain unpleasantness ratings, and that individual preference is an important determinant of the overall emotional and distraction properties of musical stimuli.en
dc.description.sponsorshipnoneen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0305735615602144en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.subjectmooden
dc.subjectpainen
dc.subjectmusic analgesiaen
dc.subjectrelaxationen
dc.subjectmotivationen
dc.titleAnalgesic effects of self-chosen music type on cold pressor-induced pain: Motivating vs. relaxing musicen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentGlasgow Caledonian Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalPsychology of Musicen
dc.date.updated2017-09-26T10:11:37Z-
dc.description.noteRSS (14/9/17) Only had VoR attached - this has been removed, since Sage only allows postprints to be archived. Since before April 2016, full-text not required, so metadata only sent to the repository.-
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