BNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble project

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622212
Title:
BNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble project
Authors:
Carmichael, Patrick ( 0000-0003-2053-7115 ) ; Carmichael, Clare
Abstract:
This paper highlights aspects related to current research and thinking about ethical issues in relation to Brain Computer Interface (BCI) and Brain-Neuronal Computer Interfaces (BNCI) research through the experience of one particular project, BrainAble, which is exploring and developing the potential of these technologies to enable people with complex disabilities to control computers. It describes how ethical practice has been developed both within the multidisciplinary research team and with participants. Results: The paper presents findings in which participants shared their views of the project prototypes, of the potential of BCI/BNCI systems as an assistive technology, and of their other possible applications. This draws attention to the importance of ethical practice in projects where high expectations of technologies, and representations of “ideal types” of disabled users may reinforce stereotypes or drown out participant “voices”. Conclusions: Ethical frameworks for research and development in emergent areas such as BCI/BNCI systems should be based on broad notions of a “duty of care” while being sufficiently flexible that researchers can adapt project procedures according to participant needs. They need to be frequently revisited, not only in the light of experience, but also to ensure they reflect new research findings and ever more complex and powerful technologies.
Affiliation:
Liverpool John Moores University; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Carmichael P, Carmichael C (2013) 'BNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble project', Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 9 (1), pp.41-47.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Issue Date:
6-Dec-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622212
DOI:
10.3109/17483107.2013.867372
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/17483107.2013.867372
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1748-3107
EISSN:
1748-3115
Appears in Collections:
Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, Patricken
dc.contributor.authorCarmichael, Clareen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-21T12:58:39Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-21T12:58:39Z-
dc.date.issued2013-12-06-
dc.identifier.citationCarmichael P, Carmichael C (2013) 'BNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble project', Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 9 (1), pp.41-47.en
dc.identifier.issn1748-3107-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/17483107.2013.867372-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622212-
dc.description.abstractThis paper highlights aspects related to current research and thinking about ethical issues in relation to Brain Computer Interface (BCI) and Brain-Neuronal Computer Interfaces (BNCI) research through the experience of one particular project, BrainAble, which is exploring and developing the potential of these technologies to enable people with complex disabilities to control computers. It describes how ethical practice has been developed both within the multidisciplinary research team and with participants. Results: The paper presents findings in which participants shared their views of the project prototypes, of the potential of BCI/BNCI systems as an assistive technology, and of their other possible applications. This draws attention to the importance of ethical practice in projects where high expectations of technologies, and representations of “ideal types” of disabled users may reinforce stereotypes or drown out participant “voices”. Conclusions: Ethical frameworks for research and development in emergent areas such as BCI/BNCI systems should be based on broad notions of a “duty of care” while being sufficiently flexible that researchers can adapt project procedures according to participant needs. They need to be frequently revisited, not only in the light of experience, but also to ensure they reflect new research findings and ever more complex and powerful technologies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/17483107.2013.867372en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectassistive technologyen
dc.subjectbrain-neuronal computer interfaceen
dc.subjectresearch ethicsen
dc.subjectparticipatory research,en
dc.titleBNCI systems as a potential assistive technology: ethical issues and participatory research in the BrainAble projecten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1748-3115-
dc.contributor.departmentLiverpool John Moores Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technologyen
dc.date.updated2017-09-20T14:18:06Z-
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