Work-related wellbeing in UK higher education - 2014

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622171
Title:
Work-related wellbeing in UK higher education - 2014
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Wray, Siobhan
Abstract:
This report presents the findings of a national survey of work-related wellbeing in higher education. The sample comprised 6439 respondents working in academic and academic-related roles in UK universities and colleges.  The Health and Safety Executive framework for measuring work-related stress was used and findings compared with data obtained in previous waves of the research.  Other factors, such as perceptions of stress, illegitimate tasks and change fatigue and job satisfaction were examined.  Mental and physical health, absenteeism and presenteeism and work-life balance were also assessed. The implications for UK higher education are discussed. 
Affiliation:
University and College Union
Citation:
University and College Union (2015) 'Work-related wellbeing in UK higher education - 2014': University and College Union.
Publisher:
University and College Union
Issue Date:
30-Aug-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622171
Type:
Technical Report
Language:
en
Sponsors:
The survey was funded by the University and College Union
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.contributor.authorWray, Siobhanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-09-01T10:12:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-09-01T10:12:26Z-
dc.date.issued2017-08-30-
dc.identifier.citationUniversity and College Union (2015) 'Work-related wellbeing in UK higher education - 2014': University and College Union.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622171-
dc.description.abstractThis report presents the findings of a national survey of work-related wellbeing in higher education. The sample comprised 6439 respondents working in academic and academic-related roles in UK universities and colleges.  The Health and Safety Executive framework for measuring work-related stress was used and findings compared with data obtained in previous waves of the research.  Other factors, such as perceptions of stress, illegitimate tasks and change fatigue and job satisfaction were examined.  Mental and physical health, absenteeism and presenteeism and work-life balance were also assessed. The implications for UK higher education are discussed. en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe survey was funded by the University and College Unionen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity and College Unionen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectwork-related stressen
dc.subjectC811 Occupational Psychologyen
dc.titleWork-related wellbeing in UK higher education - 2014en
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity and College Unionen
dc.date.updated2017-09-01T10:01:25Z-
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