Effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrations

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622093
Title:
Effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrations
Authors:
Bailey, Daniel Paul ( 0000-0003-3772-630X ) ; Maylor, Benjamin D.; Orton, Charlie J.; Zakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.
Abstract:
Purpose: Breaking up prolonged sitting can attenuate the postprandial rise in glucose and insulin. Whether such effects are dependent of the glycaemic index (GI) of the consumed carbohydrate is unknown. This study examined the acute effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following a low GI and a high GI breakfast on postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Procedures: Fourteen adult males aged 22.1 ± 1.2 years completed four, 4 h experimental conditions: high GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (HGI-SIT), low GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (LGI-SIT), high GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (HGI-ACT), and low GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (LGI-ACT). Positive incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (mean [95% CI]) for each 4h experimental condition was calculated. Statistical analyses were completed using linear mixed models. Results: The sitting × breakfast GI interaction was not significant for glucose positive iAUC (P=0.119). Glucose positive iAUC (mmol/L4 h−1) was significantly lower in the activity breaks conditions than the uninterrupted sitting conditions (2.07 [2.24, 2.89] vs. 2.56 [1.74, 2.40], respectively, P=0.004) and significantly lower in the low GI conditions than the high GI conditions (2.13 [1.80, 2.45] vs. 2.51 [2.18, 2.84], respectively, P=0.022). Insulin concentrations did not differ between conditions (P ≥ 0.203). Conclusions: Breaking up prolonged sitting and lowering breakfast GI independently reduced postprandial glucose responses. This indicates that interrupting prolonged sitting and reducing dietary GI are beneficial approaches for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Bailey DP, Maylor BD, Orton CJ, Zakrzewski-Fruer JK (2017) 'Effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrations', European Journal of Applied Physiology.
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Issue Date:
8-Apr-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622093
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-017-3610-4
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-017-3610-4
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1439-6319
Appears in Collections:
Sport and physical activity

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Daniel Paulen
dc.contributor.authorMaylor, Benjamin D.en
dc.contributor.authorOrton, Charlie J.en
dc.contributor.authorZakrzewski-Fruer, Julia K.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-16T08:17:16Z-
dc.date.available2017-05-16T08:17:16Z-
dc.date.issued2017-04-08-
dc.identifier.citationBailey DP, Maylor BD, Orton CJ, Zakrzewski-Fruer JK (2017) 'Effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrations', European Journal of Applied Physiology.en
dc.identifier.issn1439-6319-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-017-3610-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622093-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Breaking up prolonged sitting can attenuate the postprandial rise in glucose and insulin. Whether such effects are dependent of the glycaemic index (GI) of the consumed carbohydrate is unknown. This study examined the acute effects of breaking up prolonged sitting following a low GI and a high GI breakfast on postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations. Procedures: Fourteen adult males aged 22.1 ± 1.2 years completed four, 4 h experimental conditions: high GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (HGI-SIT), low GI breakfast followed by uninterrupted sitting (LGI-SIT), high GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (HGI-ACT), and low GI breakfast followed by 2 min activity breaks every 20 min (LGI-ACT). Positive incremental area under the curve (iAUC) for glucose and insulin (mean [95% CI]) for each 4h experimental condition was calculated. Statistical analyses were completed using linear mixed models. Results: The sitting × breakfast GI interaction was not significant for glucose positive iAUC (P=0.119). Glucose positive iAUC (mmol/L4 h−1) was significantly lower in the activity breaks conditions than the uninterrupted sitting conditions (2.07 [2.24, 2.89] vs. 2.56 [1.74, 2.40], respectively, P=0.004) and significantly lower in the low GI conditions than the high GI conditions (2.13 [1.80, 2.45] vs. 2.51 [2.18, 2.84], respectively, P=0.022). Insulin concentrations did not differ between conditions (P ≥ 0.203). Conclusions: Breaking up prolonged sitting and lowering breakfast GI independently reduced postprandial glucose responses. This indicates that interrupting prolonged sitting and reducing dietary GI are beneficial approaches for reducing cardiometabolic disease risk.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-017-3610-4en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectprolonged sittingen
dc.subjectsedentary behaviouren
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectpostprandial glucoseen
dc.subjectpostprandial insulinen
dc.subjectcardiometabolic diseaseen
dc.subjectsittingen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleEffects of breaking up prolonged sitting following low and high glycaemic index breakfast consumption on glucose and insulin concentrationsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiologyen
dc.date.updated2017-05-16T00:00:27Z-
dc.description.noteThis article is an open access publication-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.