Functional language & literacy in practice: a higher education music context

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622058
Title:
Functional language & literacy in practice: a higher education music context
Authors:
Galeazzi, Michael; Shannon, Anthony; Krawczyk-Bernotas, Zofia
Abstract:
Currently most Higher Education (HE) and Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses do not specifically address functional literacy skills. A student could potentially pass the course, yet still be functionally illiterate. This paper is an attempt to consider what language and literacy issues might mean in practice in the context of Australian music higher education through investigating the role of reflective practice in music performance. A graduating music performance class at the Australian Institute of Music is employed as a case study to unpack the role of functional literacy in this context. Here, aligning cognitive processes with course development may avail opportunities for literacy skills to develop, but it still remains a question as to where such opportunities could exist within the broader education field. Regardless, the aim is to support content understanding by focusing on the nature and practices of academic reading and writing in all education environments.
Affiliation:
Monash University; Australian Institute of Music
Citation:
Galeazzi, M., Shannon, A., Krawczyk-Bernotas, Z. (2017) 'Functional language & literacy in practice: a higher education music context' Journal of pedagogic development 7 (1) 52-69
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Mar-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/622058
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/issue/viewIssue/29/7
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGaleazzi, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorShannon, Anthonyen
dc.contributor.authorKrawczyk-Bernotas, Zofiaen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-17T10:00:12Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-17T10:00:12Z-
dc.date.issued2017-03-
dc.identifier.citationGaleazzi, M., Shannon, A., Krawczyk-Bernotas, Z. (2017) 'Functional language & literacy in practice: a higher education music context' Journal of pedagogic development 7 (1) 52-69en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/622058-
dc.description.abstractCurrently most Higher Education (HE) and Vocational Education and Training (VET) courses do not specifically address functional literacy skills. A student could potentially pass the course, yet still be functionally illiterate. This paper is an attempt to consider what language and literacy issues might mean in practice in the context of Australian music higher education through investigating the role of reflective practice in music performance. A graduating music performance class at the Australian Institute of Music is employed as a case study to unpack the role of functional literacy in this context. Here, aligning cognitive processes with course development may avail opportunities for literacy skills to develop, but it still remains a question as to where such opportunities could exist within the broader education field. Regardless, the aim is to support content understanding by focusing on the nature and practices of academic reading and writing in all education environments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/issue/viewIssue/29/7en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectfunctional languageen
dc.subjectfunctional literacyen
dc.subjectliteracyen
dc.subjectmusic educationen
dc.titleFunctional language & literacy in practice: a higher education music contexten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMonash Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentAustralian Institute of Musicen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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