What does a globalized curriculum look like for diverse learners in primary schools?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621996
Title:
What does a globalized curriculum look like for diverse learners in primary schools?
Authors:
Mistry, Malini Tina ( 0000-0001-9225-6414 ) ; Sood, Krishan
Abstract:
Children in our classrooms today come from a wide variety of backgrounds, and some have English as an Additional Language (EAL). Haslam et al define such children as ‘learners whose preferred language/s are not English and therefore add it to their language/s’ (2005: 97). The words diversity and globalization have numerous and contested meanings. We begin this article by looking at the multiple ways in which the ideas these terms express are conceptualized, especially for primary school children with EAL. We then explore globalization as a concept to see how it links with diversity so that relevant knowledge is generated using ideas from empirical and methodological studies. Finally, we consider how primary school leaders can bring a global dimension into their curriculum.
Citation:
Mistry, M. and Sood, K. (2016) 'What does a globalized curriculum look like for diverse learners in primary schools?', Race Equality Teaching, 33 (3), pp.30-35.
Publisher:
UCL IOE Press
Journal:
Race Equality Teaching
Issue Date:
3-Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621996
DOI:
10.18546/RET.33.3.07
Additional Links:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ioep/ret/2016/00000033/00000003/art00007
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1478-8551
Appears in Collections:
Education

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMistry, Malini Tinaen
dc.contributor.authorSood, Krishanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T11:33:38Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-24T11:33:38Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-03-
dc.identifier.citationMistry, M. and Sood, K. (2016) 'What does a globalized curriculum look like for diverse learners in primary schools?', Race Equality Teaching, 33 (3), pp.30-35.en
dc.identifier.issn1478-8551-
dc.identifier.doi10.18546/RET.33.3.07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621996-
dc.description.abstractChildren in our classrooms today come from a wide variety of backgrounds, and some have English as an Additional Language (EAL). Haslam et al define such children as ‘learners whose preferred language/s are not English and therefore add it to their language/s’ (2005: 97). The words diversity and globalization have numerous and contested meanings. We begin this article by looking at the multiple ways in which the ideas these terms express are conceptualized, especially for primary school children with EAL. We then explore globalization as a concept to see how it links with diversity so that relevant knowledge is generated using ideas from empirical and methodological studies. Finally, we consider how primary school leaders can bring a global dimension into their curriculum.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUCL IOE Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ioep/ret/2016/00000033/00000003/art00007en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectglobalisationen
dc.subjectdiverse learnersen
dc.subjectcurriculumen
dc.subjectprimary educationen
dc.subjectX320 Academic studies in Primary Educationen
dc.titleWhat does a globalized curriculum look like for diverse learners in primary schools?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRace Equality Teachingen
dc.date.updated2017-01-24T11:17:38Z-
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