Working conditions, work-life conflict and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of affective rumination and detachment

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621995
Title:
Working conditions, work-life conflict and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of affective rumination and detachment
Authors:
Kinman, Gail; Clements, Andrew James ( 0000-0003-0265-0376 ) ; Hart, Jacqui
Abstract:
Although prison officers experience the working conditions associated with work-life conflict, little research has explored this issue. This study draws upon the work-home resources model (ten Brummelhuis & Bakker, 2012) to investigate relationships between working conditions (demands and experiences of aggression) and time-based, strain-based and behavior-based work-life conflict in UK prison officers (n = 1,682). Associations between working conditions, work-life conflict, and emotional exhaustion were also examined. Two recovery behaviors (affective rumination and detachment) were considered as potential moderators of associations between working conditions and emotional exhaustion. High levels of all work-life conflict dimensions were found which were related to working conditions and emotional exhaustion. Some evidence was found that higher rumination and lower detachment exacerbated the positive association between both job demands and aggression and emotional exhaustion. The implications of the findings for the wellbeing and professional functioning of prison officers are discussed, together with key areas for future research.
Citation:
Kinman, G., Clements, A., Hart, J. (2016) 'Working conditions, work-life conflict and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of affective rumination and detachment', Criminal Justice and Behavior, 44 (2), pp.226-239.
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
Criminal Justice and Behavior
Issue Date:
25-Aug-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621995
DOI:
10.1177/0093854816664923
Additional Links:
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0093854816664923
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0093-8548
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.contributor.authorClements, Andrew Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorHart, Jacquien
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-24T11:33:19Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-24T11:33:19Z-
dc.date.issued2016-08-25-
dc.identifier.citationKinman, G., Clements, A., Hart, J. (2016) 'Working conditions, work-life conflict and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of affective rumination and detachment', Criminal Justice and Behavior, 44 (2), pp.226-239.en
dc.identifier.issn0093-8548-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0093854816664923-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621995-
dc.description.abstractAlthough prison officers experience the working conditions associated with work-life conflict, little research has explored this issue. This study draws upon the work-home resources model (ten Brummelhuis & Bakker, 2012) to investigate relationships between working conditions (demands and experiences of aggression) and time-based, strain-based and behavior-based work-life conflict in UK prison officers (n = 1,682). Associations between working conditions, work-life conflict, and emotional exhaustion were also examined. Two recovery behaviors (affective rumination and detachment) were considered as potential moderators of associations between working conditions and emotional exhaustion. High levels of all work-life conflict dimensions were found which were related to working conditions and emotional exhaustion. Some evidence was found that higher rumination and lower detachment exacerbated the positive association between both job demands and aggression and emotional exhaustion. The implications of the findings for the wellbeing and professional functioning of prison officers are discussed, together with key areas for future research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0093854816664923en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectwork-life conflicten
dc.subjectwork-life balanceen
dc.subjectprison officersen
dc.subjectcorrectional staffen
dc.subjectworking conditionsen
dc.subjectburnouten
dc.subjectrecoveryen
dc.subjectC811 Occupational Psychologyen
dc.titleWorking conditions, work-life conflict and wellbeing in UK prison officers: the role of affective rumination and detachmenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCriminal Justice and Behavioren
dc.date.updated2017-01-24T11:17:39Z-
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