Ventriloquation and ghostwriting as responses to oppression in therapy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621992
Title:
Ventriloquation and ghostwriting as responses to oppression in therapy
Authors:
Simon, Gail
Abstract:
Background People coming to therapy as part of their recovery from torture may choose not to speak or write about their experiences, yet the process of seeking asylum requires that they must hand over their life stories for a true–false adjudication with potentially life and death consequences. When people have been silenced and speaking has become dangerous, there are major ethical challenges for the activist practitioner who, along with the person who has experienced torture, sees the importance of stories not only being understood and shared in ways which are factual but which contain truth. Methods I share my experiments with writing as a form of inquiry, specifically ghostwriting and ventriloquation. Findings These have the effects of (1) moving the therapeutic process into a collaborative inquiry between the client, an asylum seeker, and me as both counsellor and expert witness; (2) letting fictionalised tellings of ‘real life’ reveal the hidden and complex life stories of clients and counsellors and (3) sharing stories which would otherwise remain hidden and risk perpetuating oppressive practices. Implications for practice Ghostwriting and ventriloquation offer the practitioner-researcher ways of speaking from a first-person position, from ‘within’ experience rather than a distanced ‘about-ness’ position. In this dialogical writing, I use actual and imagined inner and outer voices to enable the sound of talk and thought to be reflexively and empathically heard and felt by readers. Relational ethics are considered in how to imagine the other and manage ownership of stories without reproducing oppressive practices.
Citation:
Simon G. (2016) 'Ventriloquation and ghostwriting as responses to oppression in therapy', Counselling and psychotherapy research, 17 (Special section), pp.16-24.
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Counselling and psychotherapy research
Issue Date:
2-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621992
DOI:
10.1002/capr.12083
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/capr.12083/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1473-3145
EISSN:
1473-3145
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Gailen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-23T14:03:26Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-23T14:03:26Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-02-
dc.identifier.citationSimon G. (2016) 'Ventriloquation and ghostwriting as responses to oppression in therapy', Counselling and psychotherapy research, 17 (Special section), pp.16-24.en
dc.identifier.issn1473-3145-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/capr.12083-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621992-
dc.description.abstractBackground People coming to therapy as part of their recovery from torture may choose not to speak or write about their experiences, yet the process of seeking asylum requires that they must hand over their life stories for a true–false adjudication with potentially life and death consequences. When people have been silenced and speaking has become dangerous, there are major ethical challenges for the activist practitioner who, along with the person who has experienced torture, sees the importance of stories not only being understood and shared in ways which are factual but which contain truth. Methods I share my experiments with writing as a form of inquiry, specifically ghostwriting and ventriloquation. Findings These have the effects of (1) moving the therapeutic process into a collaborative inquiry between the client, an asylum seeker, and me as both counsellor and expert witness; (2) letting fictionalised tellings of ‘real life’ reveal the hidden and complex life stories of clients and counsellors and (3) sharing stories which would otherwise remain hidden and risk perpetuating oppressive practices. Implications for practice Ghostwriting and ventriloquation offer the practitioner-researcher ways of speaking from a first-person position, from ‘within’ experience rather than a distanced ‘about-ness’ position. In this dialogical writing, I use actual and imagined inner and outer voices to enable the sound of talk and thought to be reflexively and empathically heard and felt by readers. Relational ethics are considered in how to imagine the other and manage ownership of stories without reproducing oppressive practices.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/capr.12083/abstracten
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.subjectsystemic practiceen
dc.subjectsystemic therapyen
dc.titleVentriloquation and ghostwriting as responses to oppression in therapyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1473-3145-
dc.identifier.journalCounselling and psychotherapy researchen
dc.date.updated2017-01-23T13:56:37Z-
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