2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621991
Title:
Youth crime and youth justice 2015–2020
Authors:
Pitts, John
Abstract:
This article considers current issues in crime and justice in the UK and how these may bear upon young people over the next five years. It looks first at the ‘crime drop’ and observes that while conventional crime is falling, cyber crime is growing exponentially and that this may impact disproportionately upon the young. It examines the data on ethnicity, crime and victimisation and concludes that young Black men face particular dangers, particularly if they find themselves caught up in the penal system. It asks whether sexual offending is increasing, as the available data suggests, or whether it is just more widely reported and investigated and it raises questions about how it is to be policed in the future. It asks whether gang crime is growing or changing and, finally, it speculates about how the major parties may deal with ‘law and order’ in the run-up to the May 2015 election.
Citation:
Pitts J. (2015) 'Youth crime and youth justice 2015–2020', Youth and Policy, 114, pp.31-42.
Publisher:
National Youth Agency
Journal:
Youth and Policy
Issue Date:
1-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621991
Additional Links:
http://www.youthandpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/pitts-yoht-crime-youth-justice-2015-2020.pdf
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0262-9798
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPitts, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-23T14:03:21Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-23T14:03:21Z-
dc.date.issued2015-05-01-
dc.identifier.citationPitts J. (2015) 'Youth crime and youth justice 2015–2020', Youth and Policy, 114, pp.31-42.en
dc.identifier.issn0262-9798-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621991-
dc.description.abstractThis article considers current issues in crime and justice in the UK and how these may bear upon young people over the next five years. It looks first at the ‘crime drop’ and observes that while conventional crime is falling, cyber crime is growing exponentially and that this may impact disproportionately upon the young. It examines the data on ethnicity, crime and victimisation and concludes that young Black men face particular dangers, particularly if they find themselves caught up in the penal system. It asks whether sexual offending is increasing, as the available data suggests, or whether it is just more widely reported and investigated and it raises questions about how it is to be policed in the future. It asks whether gang crime is growing or changing and, finally, it speculates about how the major parties may deal with ‘law and order’ in the run-up to the May 2015 election.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Youth Agencyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.youthandpolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/pitts-yoht-crime-youth-justice-2015-2020.pdfen
dc.rightsWhite - archiving not formally supported-
dc.subjectyouthen
dc.subjectyouth crimeen
dc.subjectjusticeen
dc.subjectpolicyen
dc.subjectlaw and orderen
dc.titleYouth crime and youth justice 2015–2020en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalYouth and Policyen
dc.date.updated2017-01-23T13:56:38Z-
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