2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621963
Title:
Corals at the EDGE of existence
Authors:
Crabbe, M. James C.
Abstract:
There are numerous human and environmental challenges to coral reefs that leave many species of scleractinian corals globally threatened. The EDGE of Existence (Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered) programme commenced in 2007 at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). The purpose of the programme was to focus resources for science and conservation on species where little research had been done, or where there were no conservation plans. The programme was developed to support EDGE Fellows who came from, and were based, in the countries where the EDGE species existed. So far, 58 Fellows have been supported, in 33 countries. The Fellowship lasts 2 years, and provides training to develop science and conservation techniques, including outreach and policy development. A grant enables initial implementation of the project. The EDGE programme aims to train future leaders in conservation science. In 2011 the programme was expanded from mammal, amphibian, reptile and bird species to include coral reefs. Specific training in coral reef biology, taxonomy and ecology is provided, together with SCUBA training if necessary. Marine conservationists are able to target conservation projects directed to specific species in Africa, Asia and the Americas.
Affiliation:
University of Oxford
Citation:
Crabbe M.J.C. (2016) 'Corals at the EDGE of existence', Journal of marine science, 6 (5).
Publisher:
OMICS International
Journal:
Journal of marine science
Issue Date:
16-Sep-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621963
DOI:
10.4172/2155-9910.1000e143
Additional Links:
https://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/corals-at-the-edge-of-existence-2155-9910-1000e143.php?aid=79945
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2155-9910
EISSN:
2155-9910
Appears in Collections:
Biomedical and biological science

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCrabbe, M. James C.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T14:21:54Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T14:21:54Z-
dc.date.issued2016-09-16-
dc.identifier.citationCrabbe M.J.C. (2016) 'Corals at the EDGE of existence', Journal of marine science, 6 (5).en
dc.identifier.issn2155-9910-
dc.identifier.doi10.4172/2155-9910.1000e143-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621963-
dc.description.abstractThere are numerous human and environmental challenges to coral reefs that leave many species of scleractinian corals globally threatened. The EDGE of Existence (Evolutionarily Distinct and Globally Endangered) programme commenced in 2007 at the Zoological Society of London (ZSL). The purpose of the programme was to focus resources for science and conservation on species where little research had been done, or where there were no conservation plans. The programme was developed to support EDGE Fellows who came from, and were based, in the countries where the EDGE species existed. So far, 58 Fellows have been supported, in 33 countries. The Fellowship lasts 2 years, and provides training to develop science and conservation techniques, including outreach and policy development. A grant enables initial implementation of the project. The EDGE programme aims to train future leaders in conservation science. In 2011 the programme was expanded from mammal, amphibian, reptile and bird species to include coral reefs. Specific training in coral reef biology, taxonomy and ecology is provided, together with SCUBA training if necessary. Marine conservationists are able to target conservation projects directed to specific species in Africa, Asia and the Americas.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOMICS Internationalen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.omicsonline.org/open-access/corals-at-the-edge-of-existence-2155-9910-1000e143.php?aid=79945en
dc.rightsBlue - can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectcoral reefsen
dc.subjectC150 Environmental Biologyen
dc.titleCorals at the EDGE of existenceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2155-9910-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Oxforden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of marine scienceen
dc.date.updated2017-01-20T14:20:15Z-
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