Child protection in Islamic contexts: identifying cultural and religious appropriate mechanisms and processes using a roundtable methodology

2.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621959
Title:
Child protection in Islamic contexts: identifying cultural and religious appropriate mechanisms and processes using a roundtable methodology
Authors:
Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X ) ; O'Leary, Patrick J.; Squire, Jason; Hope, Kristen
Abstract:
This paper reports on a piece of research which brought together eight Islamic scholars, four child protection academics and two international development agencies to identify mechanisms and processes which safeguard children from harm that are congruent with Islamic scholarship and practices. Roundtable methodology was used to share knowledge, build networks and increase engagement with child protection by bringing together different stakeholders to share experiences and encourage collaboration in a relatively cost-effective manner. Four key themes were identified following initial qualitative data analysis of the roundtable discussion: (1) The convergence and divergence in Islamic thought on issues of child protection; (2) knowledge sharing and partnership working; (3) individual and collective wellbeing; and (4) mechanisms and tools for intervention. Findings from the roundtable indicate that a reliance on solely Western-based models does not allow for the trust and credibility that enable intervention at a deeper level in Islamic communities. Critically, the roundtable highlighted a significant gap in how Islamic knowledge and principles are practically applied to child protection policy and practice in international development contexts. Next steps are identified for building a knowledge base that can be practised in Islamic communities.
Citation:
Hutchinson A., O'Leary P., Squire J., Hope K. (2015) 'Child protection in Islamic contexts: identifying cultural and religious appropriate mechanisms and processes using a roundtable methodology', Child Abuse Review, 24 (6), pp.395-408.
Publisher:
WILEY-BLACKWELL
Journal:
Child Abuse Review
Issue Date:
3-Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621959
DOI:
10.1002/car.2304
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/car.2304/abstract
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0952-9136
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen
dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Patrick J.en
dc.contributor.authorSquire, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorHope, Kristenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-20T11:30:08Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-20T11:30:08Z-
dc.date.issued2014-04-03-
dc.identifier.citationHutchinson A., O'Leary P., Squire J., Hope K. (2015) 'Child protection in Islamic contexts: identifying cultural and religious appropriate mechanisms and processes using a roundtable methodology', Child Abuse Review, 24 (6), pp.395-408.en
dc.identifier.issn0952-9136-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/car.2304-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621959-
dc.description.abstractThis paper reports on a piece of research which brought together eight Islamic scholars, four child protection academics and two international development agencies to identify mechanisms and processes which safeguard children from harm that are congruent with Islamic scholarship and practices. Roundtable methodology was used to share knowledge, build networks and increase engagement with child protection by bringing together different stakeholders to share experiences and encourage collaboration in a relatively cost-effective manner. Four key themes were identified following initial qualitative data analysis of the roundtable discussion: (1) The convergence and divergence in Islamic thought on issues of child protection; (2) knowledge sharing and partnership working; (3) individual and collective wellbeing; and (4) mechanisms and tools for intervention. Findings from the roundtable indicate that a reliance on solely Western-based models does not allow for the trust and credibility that enable intervention at a deeper level in Islamic communities. Critically, the roundtable highlighted a significant gap in how Islamic knowledge and principles are practically applied to child protection policy and practice in international development contexts. Next steps are identified for building a knowledge base that can be practised in Islamic communities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWILEY-BLACKWELLen
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/car.2304/abstracten
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.subjectIslamen
dc.subjectchild protectionen
dc.subjectroundtable methodologyen
dc.subjectcultureen
dc.subjectreligionen
dc.titleChild protection in Islamic contexts: identifying cultural and religious appropriate mechanisms and processes using a roundtable methodologyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild Abuse Reviewen
dc.date.updated2017-01-20T11:22:16Z-
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.