2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621952
Title:
Testing four skills in Japan
Authors:
Green, Anthony
Abstract:
This paper considers arguments for the testing of spoken language skills in Japan and the contribution the use of such tests might make to language education. The Japanese government, recognising the importance of spontaneous social interaction in English to participation in regional and global communities, mandates the development of all ‘four skills’ (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking) in schools. However, university entrance tests continue to emphasize the written language. Because they control access to opportunities, entrance tests tend to dominate teaching and learning. They are widely believed to encourage traditional forms of teaching and to inhibit speaking and listening activities in the classroom. Comprehensive testing of spoken language skills should, in contrast, encourage (or at least not discourage) the teaching and learning of these skills. On the other hand, testing spoken language skills also represents a substantial challenge. New organisational structures are needed to support new testing formats and these will be unfamiliar to all involved, resulting in an increased risk of system failures. Introducing radical change to any educational system is likely to provoke a reaction from those who benefit most from the status quo. For this reason, critics will be ready to exploit any perceived shortcomings to reverse innovative policies. Experience suggests that radical changes in approaches to testing are unlikely to deliver benefits for the education system unless they are well supported by teacher training, new materials and public relations initiatives. The introduction of spoken language tests is no doubt essential to the success of Japan’s language policies, but is not without risk and needs to be carefully integrated with other aspects of the education system.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Green A (2016) 'Testing four skills in Japan', JASELE journal (Special edition), pp.135-144.
Publisher:
Japan Society of English Language Education
Journal:
JASELE journal
Issue Date:
1-Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621952
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2423-9488
Appears in Collections:
English language learning and assessment

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Anthonyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-19T11:41:29Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-19T11:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2016-02-01-
dc.identifier.citationGreen A (2016) 'Testing four skills in Japan', JASELE journal (Special edition), pp.135-144.en
dc.identifier.issn2423-9488-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621952-
dc.description.abstractThis paper considers arguments for the testing of spoken language skills in Japan and the contribution the use of such tests might make to language education. The Japanese government, recognising the importance of spontaneous social interaction in English to participation in regional and global communities, mandates the development of all ‘four skills’ (Reading, Writing, Listening and Speaking) in schools. However, university entrance tests continue to emphasize the written language. Because they control access to opportunities, entrance tests tend to dominate teaching and learning. They are widely believed to encourage traditional forms of teaching and to inhibit speaking and listening activities in the classroom. Comprehensive testing of spoken language skills should, in contrast, encourage (or at least not discourage) the teaching and learning of these skills. On the other hand, testing spoken language skills also represents a substantial challenge. New organisational structures are needed to support new testing formats and these will be unfamiliar to all involved, resulting in an increased risk of system failures. Introducing radical change to any educational system is likely to provoke a reaction from those who benefit most from the status quo. For this reason, critics will be ready to exploit any perceived shortcomings to reverse innovative policies. Experience suggests that radical changes in approaches to testing are unlikely to deliver benefits for the education system unless they are well supported by teacher training, new materials and public relations initiatives. The introduction of spoken language tests is no doubt essential to the success of Japan’s language policies, but is not without risk and needs to be carefully integrated with other aspects of the education system.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJapan Society of English Language Educationen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectlanguage testingen
dc.subjectJapanen
dc.subjectlanguage policyen
dc.subjectlanguage assessmenten
dc.titleTesting four skills in Japanen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJASELE journalen
dc.date.updated2017-01-19T10:58:16Z-
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