Oxidant production in exercise: effects of exercise intensity and an environmental stressor on rate of oxidant production

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621945
Title:
Oxidant production in exercise: effects of exercise intensity and an environmental stressor on rate of oxidant production
Authors:
Mathie, Annabel K.
Abstract:
Oxidant production in exercise was investigated with the aim of determining whether certain exercise intensities could cause increases in post exercise concentrations of urinary free radical markers, when compared to pre-exercise marker concentrations, by use of a simple, easy to repeat study. Subjects exercised at a variety of set percentages of maximum oxygen intake capacity (V02 Max) for 30 minutes, following which urine samples were taken at scheduled time points for up to 24 hours. Samples were analysed for markers of free radical damage to cellular structures. No significant differences in concentrations were found between individual sample time-points in each urinary free radical marker (p=>O.OS). However urinary concentrations of each marker were significantly different (p=<O.OS). For all urinary markers analysed there was a significant difference in concentrations between exercise at an intensities of 1 00% V02 Max and 85% V02 Max (p=<O.OS). Also observed was a general pattern of concentration changes over the 24 hours, for all urinary markers. Oxidant production was also studied in a group of Free Divers as they competed in three classes in a World Championship free dive event. Subjects gave urine samples pre-dive and post-dive which were analysed for markers of free radical damage to cellular structures, as before. Of the three classes studied, the Static event consistently produced the highest concentrations of urinary markers, possibly due to a weaker 'dive reflex' response in the divers. The results of both studies demonstrate that concentrations of urinary markers of free radical damage are unique to each individual. However, the significant differences found between markers show that different forms and intensities of exercise produce different magnitudes of free radical markers in the urine. Such analysis can provide useful information into how different intensities of exercise may influence general health.
Citation:
Mathie, A.K. (2005) 'Oxidant production in exercise: effects of exercise intensity and an environmental stressor on rate of oxidant production'. MSc by research thesis. University of Luton.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Oct-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621945
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
Dissertation submitted to Luton University for the degree of Masters by Research
Appears in Collections:
Masters e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMathie, Annabel K.en
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-10T14:17:18Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-10T14:17:18Z-
dc.date.issued2005-10-
dc.identifier.citationMathie, A.K. (2005) 'Oxidant production in exercise: effects of exercise intensity and an environmental stressor on rate of oxidant production'. MSc by research thesis. University of Luton.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621945-
dc.descriptionDissertation submitted to Luton University for the degree of Masters by Researchen
dc.description.abstractOxidant production in exercise was investigated with the aim of determining whether certain exercise intensities could cause increases in post exercise concentrations of urinary free radical markers, when compared to pre-exercise marker concentrations, by use of a simple, easy to repeat study. Subjects exercised at a variety of set percentages of maximum oxygen intake capacity (V02 Max) for 30 minutes, following which urine samples were taken at scheduled time points for up to 24 hours. Samples were analysed for markers of free radical damage to cellular structures. No significant differences in concentrations were found between individual sample time-points in each urinary free radical marker (p=>O.OS). However urinary concentrations of each marker were significantly different (p=<O.OS). For all urinary markers analysed there was a significant difference in concentrations between exercise at an intensities of 1 00% V02 Max and 85% V02 Max (p=<O.OS). Also observed was a general pattern of concentration changes over the 24 hours, for all urinary markers. Oxidant production was also studied in a group of Free Divers as they competed in three classes in a World Championship free dive event. Subjects gave urine samples pre-dive and post-dive which were analysed for markers of free radical damage to cellular structures, as before. Of the three classes studied, the Static event consistently produced the highest concentrations of urinary markers, possibly due to a weaker 'dive reflex' response in the divers. The results of both studies demonstrate that concentrations of urinary markers of free radical damage are unique to each individual. However, the significant differences found between markers show that different forms and intensities of exercise produce different magnitudes of free radical markers in the urine. Such analysis can provide useful information into how different intensities of exercise may influence general health.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.subjectoxidant productionen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjectexercise intensityen
dc.subjectenvironmental stressorsen
dc.titleOxidant production in exercise: effects of exercise intensity and an environmental stressor on rate of oxidant productionen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
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