The potential role of social capital in the willingness to be a deceased organ donor: a case study of UK Polish migrants

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621933
Title:
The potential role of social capital in the willingness to be a deceased organ donor: a case study of UK Polish migrants
Authors:
Sharp, Chloe; Randhawa, Gurch ( 0000-0002-2289-5859 )
Abstract:
Background In the United Kingdom, the demand for transplantable organs exceeds supply, leaving many patients on the active transplant waiting list with the majority on dialysis as the kidney is the most commonly transplanted organ. This is a marked issue across black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities. This article uses the Polish migrant community as a case study for making new theoretical insights into the willingness to become an organ donor in a host country using social capital theory. Methods There were 31 participants who took part in interviews and small group discussions. Grounded theory methodology was used as the study explored the relationships between deceased organ donation, religion, and Mauss's gift-exchange theory and the notion of social capital arose as an emergent theme from the study. Results Elements of social capital were explored with participants such as social networks, civil engagement, trust, and reciprocity. Polish social networks were found to be small and the formation of networks to be influenced by English language skills. Participants were willing to donate organs to others inside and outside of their social networks in the United Kingdom and wanted to help a patient in need and influenced by the overall migrant experience in the United Kingdom and whether they felt a sense of belonging. Overall, participants had mixed experiences and views about trust in the National Health Service. Conclusions Through a discussion of the results using a communitarian social capital, cognitive and structural social capital lens, and collective-action theory, it is concluded that an interplay of these social capital theories can reframe debates within organ donation such as reciprocity policies, the relevancy of altruism, and the role of migration experiences and networks in the willingness to donate organs posthumously in a host country.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Sharp C., Randhawa G. (2016) 'The potential role of social capital in the willingness to be a deceased organ donor: a case study of UK Polish migrants', Transplantation Proceedings, 48 (3), pp.680-688.
Publisher:
Elsevier USA
Journal:
Transplantation Proceedings
Issue Date:
1-Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621933
DOI:
10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.10.063
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041134516001020
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0041-1345
Appears in Collections:
Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Chloeen
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T13:32:50Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T13:32:50Z-
dc.date.issued2016-04-01-
dc.identifier.citationSharp C., Randhawa G. (2016) 'The potential role of social capital in the willingness to be a deceased organ donor: a case study of UK Polish migrants', Transplantation Proceedings, 48 (3), pp.680-688.en
dc.identifier.issn0041-1345-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.transproceed.2015.10.063-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621933-
dc.description.abstractBackground In the United Kingdom, the demand for transplantable organs exceeds supply, leaving many patients on the active transplant waiting list with the majority on dialysis as the kidney is the most commonly transplanted organ. This is a marked issue across black, Asian, and minority ethnic communities. This article uses the Polish migrant community as a case study for making new theoretical insights into the willingness to become an organ donor in a host country using social capital theory. Methods There were 31 participants who took part in interviews and small group discussions. Grounded theory methodology was used as the study explored the relationships between deceased organ donation, religion, and Mauss's gift-exchange theory and the notion of social capital arose as an emergent theme from the study. Results Elements of social capital were explored with participants such as social networks, civil engagement, trust, and reciprocity. Polish social networks were found to be small and the formation of networks to be influenced by English language skills. Participants were willing to donate organs to others inside and outside of their social networks in the United Kingdom and wanted to help a patient in need and influenced by the overall migrant experience in the United Kingdom and whether they felt a sense of belonging. Overall, participants had mixed experiences and views about trust in the National Health Service. Conclusions Through a discussion of the results using a communitarian social capital, cognitive and structural social capital lens, and collective-action theory, it is concluded that an interplay of these social capital theories can reframe debates within organ donation such as reciprocity policies, the relevancy of altruism, and the role of migration experiences and networks in the willingness to donate organs posthumously in a host country.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier USAen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0041134516001020en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectL510 Health & Welfareen
dc.subjecttransplantationen
dc.subjectdeceased organ donationen
dc.subjectorgan donationen
dc.subjectsocial capitalen
dc.titleThe potential role of social capital in the willingness to be a deceased organ donor: a case study of UK Polish migrantsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalTransplantation Proceedingsen
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:51Z-
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