Building resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal intervention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621932
Title:
Building resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal intervention
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 ) ; Grant, Louise
Abstract:
It is widely recognised that social workers need to increase their emotional resilience to protect their wellbeing and enhance the quality of their professional practice, but there is little evidence-based guidance on how this might be achieved. This study evaluated a multi-modal intervention that aimed to improve emotional resilience and wellbeing in newly-qualified social workers from children’s services in England. More specifically, it examined whether the intervention enhanced several personal resources associated with resilience (emotional self-efficacy, reflective ability, self-compassion and compassion satisfaction/fatigue) together with the overall level of mental health. A repeated measures wait-list controlled design was utilised. Twenty-five social workers in their first year of qualified practice in children’s statutory services received training over a two-month period. The control group comprised 31 early career social workers also working in statutory children’s services. An online survey obtained data before the intervention and two months afterwards. Evidence was found that the intervention was effective in enhancing some personal resources, as well as psychological wellbeing more generally. The finding that psychological distress and compassion fatigue increased during the study period for the control group raises some concerns. The potential of the findings to inform sustainable, evidence-based interventions to protect and promote wellbeing in early career social workers is discussed.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Kinman G, Grant L (2016) 'Building resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal intervention', British Journal of Social Work.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
19-Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621932
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bcw164
Additional Links:
http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/12/13/bjsw.bcw164.short?rss=1
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0045-3102
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.contributor.authorGrant, Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T13:30:49Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T13:30:49Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-19-
dc.identifier.citationKinman G, Grant L (2016) 'Building resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal intervention', British Journal of Social Work.en
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcw164-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621932-
dc.description.abstractIt is widely recognised that social workers need to increase their emotional resilience to protect their wellbeing and enhance the quality of their professional practice, but there is little evidence-based guidance on how this might be achieved. This study evaluated a multi-modal intervention that aimed to improve emotional resilience and wellbeing in newly-qualified social workers from children’s services in England. More specifically, it examined whether the intervention enhanced several personal resources associated with resilience (emotional self-efficacy, reflective ability, self-compassion and compassion satisfaction/fatigue) together with the overall level of mental health. A repeated measures wait-list controlled design was utilised. Twenty-five social workers in their first year of qualified practice in children’s statutory services received training over a two-month period. The control group comprised 31 early career social workers also working in statutory children’s services. An online survey obtained data before the intervention and two months afterwards. Evidence was found that the intervention was effective in enhancing some personal resources, as well as psychological wellbeing more generally. The finding that psychological distress and compassion fatigue increased during the study period for the control group raises some concerns. The potential of the findings to inform sustainable, evidence-based interventions to protect and promote wellbeing in early career social workers is discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2016/12/13/bjsw.bcw164.short?rss=1en
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectresilienceen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectinterventionen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.titleBuilding resilience in early-career social workers: evaluating a multi-modal interventionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:51Z-
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