Effort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retention

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621930
Title:
Effort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retention
Authors:
Kinman, Gail ( 0000-0002-0130-1708 )
Abstract:
This study utilises the effort–reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict several indices of well-being in academics in the UK: mental ill health, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. This model posits that (a) employees who believe that their efforts are not counterbalanced by sufficient rewards will experience impaired well-being and (b) feelings of ERI are more frequent and damaging in employees who are overcommitted to the job. A sample of 649 academic employees working in UK higher education institutions completed validated measures. Findings showed that academics who found their work more demanding, who perceived greater rewards and who were less overcommitted typically reported poorer well-being across all measures. Rewards related to esteem/support and financial/status appeared to be particularly important in protecting academics from the negative impact of work-related efforts. Potential interventions are discussed that draw on the ERI framework to improve mental health, satisfaction and retention in the sector.
Citation:
Kinman G. (2016) 'Effort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retention', Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 38 (5), pp.504-518.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Journal:
Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management
Issue Date:
9-May-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621930
DOI:
10.1080/1360080X.2016.1181884
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1360080X.2016.1181884
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1360-080X
EISSN:
1469-9508
Appears in Collections:
Psychology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKinman, Gailen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T13:26:36Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T13:26:36Z-
dc.date.issued2016-05-09-
dc.identifier.citationKinman G. (2016) 'Effort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retention', Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, 38 (5), pp.504-518.en
dc.identifier.issn1360-080X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/1360080X.2016.1181884-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621930-
dc.description.abstractThis study utilises the effort–reward imbalance (ERI) model of job stress to predict several indices of well-being in academics in the UK: mental ill health, job satisfaction and leaving intentions. This model posits that (a) employees who believe that their efforts are not counterbalanced by sufficient rewards will experience impaired well-being and (b) feelings of ERI are more frequent and damaging in employees who are overcommitted to the job. A sample of 649 academic employees working in UK higher education institutions completed validated measures. Findings showed that academics who found their work more demanding, who perceived greater rewards and who were less overcommitted typically reported poorer well-being across all measures. Rewards related to esteem/support and financial/status appeared to be particularly important in protecting academics from the negative impact of work-related efforts. Potential interventions are discussed that draw on the ERI framework to improve mental health, satisfaction and retention in the sector.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1360080X.2016.1181884en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectwell-beingen
dc.subjectstressen
dc.subjectjob satisfactionen
dc.subjecteffort–reward imbalanceen
dc.subjectefforten
dc.subjectrewarden
dc.subjecthigher educationen
dc.subjectB920 Occupational Healthen
dc.titleEffort–reward imbalance and overcommitment in UK academics: implications for mental health, satisfaction and retentionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-9508-
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Higher Education Policy and Managementen
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:48Z-
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