Newspaper coverage of a Sierra Leone war crimes trial: a ‘continuation of conflict by other means’

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621929
Title:
Newspaper coverage of a Sierra Leone war crimes trial: a ‘continuation of conflict by other means’
Authors:
Silverman, Jon ( 0000-0002-1496-9344 ) ; Binneh-Kamara, Abou
Abstract:
The most controversial trial conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone convicted leaders of the Civil Defence Force of serious violations of international humanitarian law during the country’s 11-year civil war. Many in Sierra Leone thought the trial should never have been held, on the grounds that the CDF leadership were ‘heroes’ for coming to the aid of the government in the mid- 1990s. Critics argued that pressure for a prosecution came principally from outside the country, particularly the United States. Opinion in Sierra Leone tended to be shaped along ethnic and regional lines, and a research study, funded by the British Academy, has sought to establish whether domestic newspaper coverage of the trial mirrored this ethno-regional division. Borrowing a paradigm from a study of the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s, the authors conclude that in many respects, the reportage of the trial was ‘a continuation of conflict by other means’.
Citation:
Silverman J., Binneh-Kamara A. (2016) 'Newspaper coverage of a Sierra Leone war crimes trial: A ‘continuation of conflict by other means’', African Journalism Studies, 37 (2), pp.56-76.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles - no Open Select
Journal:
African Journalism Studies
Issue Date:
6-Jul-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621929
DOI:
10.1080/23743670.2016.1173571
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23743670.2016.1173571
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2374-3670
EISSN:
2374-3689
Appears in Collections:
Marketing

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSilverman, Jonen
dc.contributor.authorBinneh-Kamara, Abouen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T13:24:08Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T13:24:08Z-
dc.date.issued2016-07-06-
dc.identifier.citationSilverman J., Binneh-Kamara A. (2016) 'Newspaper coverage of a Sierra Leone war crimes trial: A ‘continuation of conflict by other means’', African Journalism Studies, 37 (2), pp.56-76.en
dc.identifier.issn2374-3670-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/23743670.2016.1173571-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621929-
dc.description.abstractThe most controversial trial conducted by the Special Court for Sierra Leone convicted leaders of the Civil Defence Force of serious violations of international humanitarian law during the country’s 11-year civil war. Many in Sierra Leone thought the trial should never have been held, on the grounds that the CDF leadership were ‘heroes’ for coming to the aid of the government in the mid- 1990s. Critics argued that pressure for a prosecution came principally from outside the country, particularly the United States. Opinion in Sierra Leone tended to be shaped along ethnic and regional lines, and a research study, funded by the British Academy, has sought to establish whether domestic newspaper coverage of the trial mirrored this ethno-regional division. Borrowing a paradigm from a study of the Yugoslav wars of the 1990s, the authors conclude that in many respects, the reportage of the trial was ‘a continuation of conflict by other means’.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis (Routledge): SSH Titles - no Open Selecten
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/23743670.2016.1173571en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectSpecial Court for Sierra Leoneen
dc.subjectcultural normsen
dc.subjectMendeen
dc.subjectethno-regionalen
dc.subjectCivil Defence Forceen
dc.subjectTemneen
dc.subjectKamajorsen
dc.subjectSierra Leoneen
dc.subjectCDFen
dc.subjectP500 Journalismen
dc.titleNewspaper coverage of a Sierra Leone war crimes trial: a ‘continuation of conflict by other means’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2374-3689-
dc.identifier.journalAfrican Journalism Studiesen
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:48Z-
This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License
Creative Commons
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.