Physical education contributes to total physical activity levels and predominantly in higher intensity physical activity categories

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621922
Title:
Physical education contributes to total physical activity levels and predominantly in higher intensity physical activity categories
Authors:
Kerr, Catherine J.; Smith, Lindsey Rachel; Charman, Sarah J.; Harvey, Stephen; Savory, Louise A.; Fairclough, Stuart J. ( 0000-0001-8358-1979 ) ; Govus, Andrew ( 0000-0001-6224-0454 )
Abstract:
Children’s engagement in physical activity of a vigorous intensity or higher is more effective at promoting cardiorespiratory fitness than moderate physical activity. It remains unclear how higher intensity physical activity varies between days when schoolchildren participate in physical education (PE) than on non-PE days. The purpose of this study was to assess how PE contributes to sedentary behaviour and the intensity profile of physical activity accumulated on PE-days than on non-PE days. 53 schoolchildren (36 girls, 11.7 ± 0.3 years) completed 5-day minute-by-minute habitual physical activity monitoring using triaxial accelerometers to determine time spent sedentary (<1.5 METs) and in light (1.5-2.9 METs), moderate (3-5.9 METs), vigorous (6-8.9 METs), hard (9-11.9 METs) and very hard intensity (≥12 METs) physical activity on PE-days and non-PE days. Sedentary time was higher on non-PE days than on PE-days (mean difference: 62 minutes, p < 0.001). Hard and very hard intensity physical activity was significantly higher on PE days compared with non-PE days (mean total difference: 33 minutes, all significant at p < 0.001). During the PE lesson, boys spent more time in hard (p < 0.01) and very hard (p < 0.01) physical activity compared to girls. Schoolchildren spent significantly more time in higher intensity physical activity and significantly less time sedentary on PE-days than on non-PE days. As well as reducing sedentary behaviour, the opportunity to promote such health-promoting higher intensity physical activity in the school setting warrants further investigation.
Citation:
Kerr C, Smith L, Charman S, Harvey S, Savory L, Fairclough S, Govus A (2016) 'Physical education contributes to total physical activity levels and predominantly in higher intensity physical activity categories', European Physical Education Review.
Publisher:
Sage
Journal:
European Physical Education Review
Issue Date:
4-Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621922
DOI:
10.1177/1356336X16672127
Additional Links:
http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1356336X16672127
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1356-336X
Appears in Collections:
Sport and physical activity

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKerr, Catherine J.en
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Lindsey Rachelen
dc.contributor.authorCharman, Sarah J.en
dc.contributor.authorHarvey, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorSavory, Louise A.en
dc.contributor.authorFairclough, Stuart J.en
dc.contributor.authorGovus, Andrewen
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T12:58:44Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T12:58:44Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-04-
dc.identifier.citationKerr C, Smith L, Charman S, Harvey S, Savory L, Fairclough S, Govus A (2016) 'Physical education contributes to total physical activity levels and predominantly in higher intensity physical activity categories', European Physical Education Review.en
dc.identifier.issn1356-336X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1356336X16672127-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621922-
dc.description.abstractChildren’s engagement in physical activity of a vigorous intensity or higher is more effective at promoting cardiorespiratory fitness than moderate physical activity. It remains unclear how higher intensity physical activity varies between days when schoolchildren participate in physical education (PE) than on non-PE days. The purpose of this study was to assess how PE contributes to sedentary behaviour and the intensity profile of physical activity accumulated on PE-days than on non-PE days. 53 schoolchildren (36 girls, 11.7 ± 0.3 years) completed 5-day minute-by-minute habitual physical activity monitoring using triaxial accelerometers to determine time spent sedentary (<1.5 METs) and in light (1.5-2.9 METs), moderate (3-5.9 METs), vigorous (6-8.9 METs), hard (9-11.9 METs) and very hard intensity (≥12 METs) physical activity on PE-days and non-PE days. Sedentary time was higher on non-PE days than on PE-days (mean difference: 62 minutes, p < 0.001). Hard and very hard intensity physical activity was significantly higher on PE days compared with non-PE days (mean total difference: 33 minutes, all significant at p < 0.001). During the PE lesson, boys spent more time in hard (p < 0.01) and very hard (p < 0.01) physical activity compared to girls. Schoolchildren spent significantly more time in higher intensity physical activity and significantly less time sedentary on PE-days than on non-PE days. As well as reducing sedentary behaviour, the opportunity to promote such health-promoting higher intensity physical activity in the school setting warrants further investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSageen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1356336X16672127en
dc.rightsGreen - can archive pre-print and post-print or publisher's version/PDF-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectphysical educationen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjecthealthen
dc.subjectpedagogyen
dc.subjectyouthen
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titlePhysical education contributes to total physical activity levels and predominantly in higher intensity physical activity categoriesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Physical Education Reviewen
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:42Z-
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