How is supervision recorded in child and family social work? an analysis of 244 written records of formal supervision

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621917
Title:
How is supervision recorded in child and family social work? an analysis of 244 written records of formal supervision
Authors:
Wilkins, David ( 0000-0003-2780-0385 )
Abstract:
Written records belie the complexity of social work practice. And yet, keeping good records is a key function for social workers in England (and elsewhere). Written records provide a future reference point for children, especially those in public care. They are foundational for the inspection of children's services. They provide practitioners and managers with an opportunity to record their thinking and decisions. They add to result from and cause much of the bureaucratic maze that practitioners have to navigate. As part of a wider study of child and family social work practice, this paper describes an analysis of more than 200 written records of supervision. These records primarily contain narrative descriptions of activity, often leading to a set of actions for the social worker to complete - what they should do next. Records of why these actions are necessary and how the social worker might undertake them are usually absent, as are records of analytical thinking or the child's views. This suggests that written records of supervision are not principally created in order to inform an understanding of the social work decision-making process; rather, they are created to demonstrate management oversight of practice and the accountability of the practitioner.
Citation:
Wilkins D. (2016) 'How is supervision recorded in child and family social work? an analysis of 244 written records of formal supervision', Child and Family Social Work.
Publisher:
Blackwell Publishing Ltd
Journal:
Child and Family Social Work
Issue Date:
20-Oct-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621917
DOI:
10.1111/cfs.12330
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cfs.12330/full
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1356-7500
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-09T12:44:02Z-
dc.date.available2017-01-09T12:44:02Z-
dc.date.issued2016-10-20-
dc.identifier.citationWilkins D. (2016) 'How is supervision recorded in child and family social work? an analysis of 244 written records of formal supervision', Child and Family Social Work.en
dc.identifier.issn1356-7500-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cfs.12330-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621917-
dc.description.abstractWritten records belie the complexity of social work practice. And yet, keeping good records is a key function for social workers in England (and elsewhere). Written records provide a future reference point for children, especially those in public care. They are foundational for the inspection of children's services. They provide practitioners and managers with an opportunity to record their thinking and decisions. They add to result from and cause much of the bureaucratic maze that practitioners have to navigate. As part of a wider study of child and family social work practice, this paper describes an analysis of more than 200 written records of supervision. These records primarily contain narrative descriptions of activity, often leading to a set of actions for the social worker to complete - what they should do next. Records of why these actions are necessary and how the social worker might undertake them are usually absent, as are records of analytical thinking or the child's views. This suggests that written records of supervision are not principally created in order to inform an understanding of the social work decision-making process; rather, they are created to demonstrate management oversight of practice and the accountability of the practitioner.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cfs.12330/fullen
dc.rightsYellow - can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)-
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectsupervisionen
dc.subjectchild protectionen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.titleHow is supervision recorded in child and family social work? an analysis of 244 written records of formal supervisionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild and Family Social Worken
dc.date.updated2017-01-09T11:59:36Z-
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