Running away, going missing and sexual exploitation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621861
Title:
Running away, going missing and sexual exploitation
Authors:
Brodie, Isabelle
Other Titles:
Promoting the wellbeing of children in care: messages from research
Abstract:
Any child or young person can be vulnerable to running away or going missing and to sexual exploitation (DfE, 2012a), but there is strong evidence that children and young people in care are at particular risk. Research shows that significant numbers of children in care go missing and are sexually exploited (Beckett, 2011; Jago et al, 2011; CEOP, 2013). This overlap is recognised in national policy, where it has been described as a ‘scandal’ and an issue that has not been sufficiently prioritised by government or local authorities (The APPG for Runaway and Missing Children and Adults and the APPG for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, 2012). A recent inquiry by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) into sexual exploitation via gangs and groups has also identified those missing from home and care as representing a ‘particular concern’ (OCC, 2012). Given that much better information now exists about the nature of these links, it is essential that such knowledge is used to help develop better practice (Jago et al, 2011).This chapter explores the relationship between children in care, children who go missing and child sexual exploitation (CSE). The information presented is applicable throughout the UK, though there are some differences in the development of legislation and policy in the four nations (see, for example, Beckett, 2011 regarding Northern Ireland; Barnardo’s, 2011a, and Brodie and Pearce, 2012 regarding Scotland). The discussion is mainly concerned with young people over the age of 10, reflecting the findings of research on young people in care who go missing and are at risk of sexual exploitation. For reasons of space, the chapter does not examine the linked and very important issue of young people who are trafficked, placed in care and also experience CSE. In terms of language, it is important to note the distinction between ‘going missing’, which is an episode of running away that is officially recorded as such, and ‘running away’, which applies to a larger group that is less easily counted.
Citation:
Brodie, I. (2014) 'Running away, going missing and sexual exploitation', in Rahilly, T., Hendry, E. (ed(s).). Promoting the wellbeing of children in care: messages from research, London: NSPCC pp.194-216.
Publisher:
NSPCC
Issue Date:
1-Jan-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621861
Additional Links:
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/research-reports/promoting-wellbeing-children-in-care-messages-from-research.pdf
Type:
Book chapter
Language:
en
ISBN:
9781908055163
Appears in Collections:
Applied social sciences

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrodie, Isabelleen
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-09T12:34:14Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-09T12:34:14Z-
dc.date.issued2014-01-01-
dc.identifier.citationBrodie, I. (2014) 'Running away, going missing and sexual exploitation', in Rahilly, T., Hendry, E. (ed(s).). Promoting the wellbeing of children in care: messages from research, London: NSPCC pp.194-216.en
dc.identifier.isbn9781908055163-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621861-
dc.description.abstractAny child or young person can be vulnerable to running away or going missing and to sexual exploitation (DfE, 2012a), but there is strong evidence that children and young people in care are at particular risk. Research shows that significant numbers of children in care go missing and are sexually exploited (Beckett, 2011; Jago et al, 2011; CEOP, 2013). This overlap is recognised in national policy, where it has been described as a ‘scandal’ and an issue that has not been sufficiently prioritised by government or local authorities (The APPG for Runaway and Missing Children and Adults and the APPG for Looked After Children and Care Leavers, 2012). A recent inquiry by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC) into sexual exploitation via gangs and groups has also identified those missing from home and care as representing a ‘particular concern’ (OCC, 2012). Given that much better information now exists about the nature of these links, it is essential that such knowledge is used to help develop better practice (Jago et al, 2011).This chapter explores the relationship between children in care, children who go missing and child sexual exploitation (CSE). The information presented is applicable throughout the UK, though there are some differences in the development of legislation and policy in the four nations (see, for example, Beckett, 2011 regarding Northern Ireland; Barnardo’s, 2011a, and Brodie and Pearce, 2012 regarding Scotland). The discussion is mainly concerned with young people over the age of 10, reflecting the findings of research on young people in care who go missing and are at risk of sexual exploitation. For reasons of space, the chapter does not examine the linked and very important issue of young people who are trafficked, placed in care and also experience CSE. In terms of language, it is important to note the distinction between ‘going missing’, which is an episode of running away that is officially recorded as such, and ‘running away’, which applies to a larger group that is less easily counted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNSPCCen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/research-reports/promoting-wellbeing-children-in-care-messages-from-research.pdfen
dc.subjectrunning awayen
dc.subjectsexual exploitationen
dc.subjectchild sexual exploitationen
dc.subjectL990 Social studies not elsewhere classifieden
dc.titleRunning away, going missing and sexual exploitationen
dc.title.alternativePromoting the wellbeing of children in care: messages from researchen
dc.typeBook chapteren
dc.date.updated2016-12-09T11:50:07Z-
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