Responding to child abuse in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA): the role of professional training programmes

4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621841
Title:
Responding to child abuse in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA): the role of professional training programmes
Authors:
Lardhi, Jehan
Abstract:
Child abuse has become more recognised in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), after many years of receiving very little attention. Since 2014 domestic violence, including child abuse, has been made a criminal offence in KSA. This study takes place against a background where protection laws (2013 Legislation) have been introduced, where there are cultural limitations, and where professional child protection agencies are requiring their practitioners to deal with child abuse in the light of these new laws. The aim of this study was to identify the issues for social workers and other professionals in responding to child abuse and how these responses can be improved in KSA. There are two phases to this study. The first phase examines developments in child protection practices and policy through the analysis of newspaper reports and through a series of interviews with professionals, practitioners and managers in the Social Protection Department (SPD) in Riyadh, KSA. The findings of this initial study suggest that KSA is in the early stages of developing and implementing programmes in child protection practice. It was found that training was a major issue, in particular the provision of training that was accessible and relevant to the needs of the practitioners. The second phase focused on ways that professional child protection training programmes for practitioners may be improved to increase both their quality and relevance to child protection professionals and trainees. In order to achieve these objectives, interviews, written responses and surveys were conducted with child protection practitioners, training providers and social work educators and trainees in the (SPD), the National Family Safety Programme (NFSP), Al-Wafa Association (AWA), Ministry of Social Affairs (MSA) and three universities in Riyadh, KSA. The findings provide more understanding of how child protection training, teaching and learning for practitioners can be improved to enable them to respond more effectively to child abuse in KSA. Findings are discussed with reference to the current practices as England and in other Arab countries and recommendations are offered with a view to their suitability in KSA.
Citation:
Lardhi, J. (2015) 'Responding to child abuse in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA): the role of professional training programmes'. PhD Thesis. University of Bedfordshire.
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/621841
Type:
Thesis or dissertation
Language:
en
Description:
A thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
Appears in Collections:
PhD e-theses

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLardhi, Jehanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-21T11:01:39Z-
dc.date.available2016-11-21T11:01:39Z-
dc.date.issued2016-03-
dc.identifier.citationLardhi, J. (2015) 'Responding to child abuse in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA): the role of professional training programmes'. PhD Thesis. University of Bedfordshire.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/621841-
dc.descriptionA thesis submitted to the University of Bedfordshire in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophyen
dc.description.abstractChild abuse has become more recognised in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), after many years of receiving very little attention. Since 2014 domestic violence, including child abuse, has been made a criminal offence in KSA. This study takes place against a background where protection laws (2013 Legislation) have been introduced, where there are cultural limitations, and where professional child protection agencies are requiring their practitioners to deal with child abuse in the light of these new laws. The aim of this study was to identify the issues for social workers and other professionals in responding to child abuse and how these responses can be improved in KSA. There are two phases to this study. The first phase examines developments in child protection practices and policy through the analysis of newspaper reports and through a series of interviews with professionals, practitioners and managers in the Social Protection Department (SPD) in Riyadh, KSA. The findings of this initial study suggest that KSA is in the early stages of developing and implementing programmes in child protection practice. It was found that training was a major issue, in particular the provision of training that was accessible and relevant to the needs of the practitioners. The second phase focused on ways that professional child protection training programmes for practitioners may be improved to increase both their quality and relevance to child protection professionals and trainees. In order to achieve these objectives, interviews, written responses and surveys were conducted with child protection practitioners, training providers and social work educators and trainees in the (SPD), the National Family Safety Programme (NFSP), Al-Wafa Association (AWA), Ministry of Social Affairs (MSA) and three universities in Riyadh, KSA. The findings provide more understanding of how child protection training, teaching and learning for practitioners can be improved to enable them to respond more effectively to child abuse in KSA. Findings are discussed with reference to the current practices as England and in other Arab countries and recommendations are offered with a view to their suitability in KSA.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectchild abuseen
dc.subjectSaudi Arabiaen
dc.subjectprofessional training programmesen
dc.subjectKSAen
dc.subjectL420 International Social Policyen
dc.titleResponding to child abuse in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA): the role of professional training programmesen
dc.typeThesis or dissertationen
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_GB
dc.type.qualificationlevelPhDen
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Bedfordshireen
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