2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611816
Title:
Key pedagogic thinkers: Jean Baudrillard
Authors:
Williams, James D.; Allinson, Robert E.
Abstract:
Jean Baudrillard was born in Reims, France, in 1929, and completed his undergraduate work at the Sorbonne, taking a degree in German. Upon graduation, he taught high school. In the early 1960s, he began graduate studies at the University of Paris, Nanterre, earning his doctorate in sociology in 1966. Baudrillard published 30 books in which he examined various facets of modern society: gender, race, consumerism, politics, the media, and so forth. His focus was semiological—how objects and signs reflect the current human condition. Although Baudrillard did not write about education, his work is nevertheless relevant if we recognize that our educational system is a reflection of society. A Baudrillardian perspective raises the following question: What effect has consumerism had on education? To address this question, we offer some background information related to Baudrillard’s philosophical inquiries. This is followed by our brief analysis of how Baudrillard’s work may provide some potential answers to the above question and of how it can help us interpret the changes that have occurred in education during the modern period. We give special emphasis to The Consumer Society and Simulacra and Simulation.
Affiliation:
Soka University
Citation:
Williams, J.E., Allinson, R.E. (2016) 'Key Pedagogic Thinkers: Jean Baudrillard'. Journal of pedagogic development 6 (2) 24-30
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611816
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/317/514
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, James D.en
dc.contributor.authorAllinson, Robert E.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T11:45:55Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-06T11:45:55Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06en
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, J.E., Allinson, R.E. (2016) 'Key Pedagogic Thinkers: Jean Baudrillard'. Journal of pedagogic development 6 (2) 24-30en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/611816en
dc.description.abstractJean Baudrillard was born in Reims, France, in 1929, and completed his undergraduate work at the Sorbonne, taking a degree in German. Upon graduation, he taught high school. In the early 1960s, he began graduate studies at the University of Paris, Nanterre, earning his doctorate in sociology in 1966. Baudrillard published 30 books in which he examined various facets of modern society: gender, race, consumerism, politics, the media, and so forth. His focus was semiological—how objects and signs reflect the current human condition. Although Baudrillard did not write about education, his work is nevertheless relevant if we recognize that our educational system is a reflection of society. A Baudrillardian perspective raises the following question: What effect has consumerism had on education? To address this question, we offer some background information related to Baudrillard’s philosophical inquiries. This is followed by our brief analysis of how Baudrillard’s work may provide some potential answers to the above question and of how it can help us interpret the changes that have occurred in education during the modern period. We give special emphasis to The Consumer Society and Simulacra and Simulation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/317/514en
dc.subjectpedagogyen
dc.subjectBaudrillarden
dc.subjectJean Baudrillarden
dc.subjectsemiologyen
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen
dc.titleKey pedagogic thinkers: Jean Baudrillarden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSoka Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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