2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611814
Title:
Classroom of the apes: is teaching monkey business?
Authors:
Jowett, Adam; Jewell, Jonathan
Abstract:
Between 1973 and 2000, social scientists conducted one of the most significant, innovative and challenging programmes in the history of linguistic and educational research. ‘Project Nim’ investigated both the interaction between nature and nurture and attempted to bring human level gestural communication to a chimpanzee called ‘Nim’. The study offered some of the most important insights into our understanding of language and cognition and what it means to be human, and represents a landmark in our thinking about teaching and learning, and education itself. Here, the authors contend that essential lessons from the experiment have been overlooked and risk being forgotten. This article revisits the study, exploring some of the issues it raises, and attempts to site what we learnt from Nim in the context of modern teaching practice. Through this re‐examination we intend to provoke thinking not only about ‘Project Nim’, but perhaps also about other lost lessons in education. We conclude by reflecting on the importance of remembering the lessons we learnt when trying to teach Nim, and how they can enhance our practice as teachers for all learners.
Affiliation:
Durham University; University College London
Citation:
Jowett, A., Jewell, J. (2016) 'Classroom of the apes: is teaching monkey business?'. Journal of pedagogic development 6 (2) 55-58
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611814
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/320/500
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJowett, Adamen
dc.contributor.authorJewell, Jonathanen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T11:29:37Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-06T11:29:37Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06en
dc.identifier.citationJowett, A., Jewell, J. (2016) 'Classroom of the apes: is teaching monkey business?'. Journal of pedagogic development 6 (2) 55-58en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/611814en
dc.description.abstractBetween 1973 and 2000, social scientists conducted one of the most significant, innovative and challenging programmes in the history of linguistic and educational research. ‘Project Nim’ investigated both the interaction between nature and nurture and attempted to bring human level gestural communication to a chimpanzee called ‘Nim’. The study offered some of the most important insights into our understanding of language and cognition and what it means to be human, and represents a landmark in our thinking about teaching and learning, and education itself. Here, the authors contend that essential lessons from the experiment have been overlooked and risk being forgotten. This article revisits the study, exploring some of the issues it raises, and attempts to site what we learnt from Nim in the context of modern teaching practice. Through this re‐examination we intend to provoke thinking not only about ‘Project Nim’, but perhaps also about other lost lessons in education. We conclude by reflecting on the importance of remembering the lessons we learnt when trying to teach Nim, and how they can enhance our practice as teachers for all learners.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/320/500en
dc.subjectteachingen
dc.subjectpedagogyen
dc.subjectlearningen
dc.subjectlanguageen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectgestural interactionen
dc.subjectnon-verbalen
dc.subjectevolutionen
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen
dc.titleClassroom of the apes: is teaching monkey business?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDurham Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity College Londonen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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