2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611801
Title:
Teaching employability skills through simulation games
Authors:
Strachan, Leslie
Abstract:
This paper examines the use of a business simulation game to test its effectiveness in promoting the awareness of employability skills in undergraduate students. A mixed approach using an-online survey tool was used to record student perceptions of how their employability skills were developed across ten courses and three faculties. The survey was conducted before the unit started, and on completion. Key emerging themes show that students demonstrated an increased awareness and development of their employability skills. They acquired and developed their skills by learning how to operate a small business start-up using a business simulation game. This research project was limited to one core unit in the curriculum, and the project is university specific. A cross university research project would add further value to the research project. Students are able to articulate the skills they have acquired and developed thus showing elements of self-awareness. An increase in student’s social capital is likely to enhance their career decisions. This paper will be of value to institutions wishing to evaluate the use of serious business simulation games to embed employability skills into the curriculum.
Affiliation:
Southampton Solent University
Citation:
Strachan, L. (2016) 'Teaching employability skills through simulation games'. Journal of pedagogic development, 6 (2) 8-17
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
Jun-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/611801
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/315/496
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorStrachan, Leslieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T11:47:06Zen
dc.date.available2016-06-06T11:47:06Zen
dc.date.issued2016-06en
dc.identifier.citationStrachan, L. (2016) 'Teaching employability skills through simulation games'. Journal of pedagogic development, 6 (2) 8-17en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/611801en
dc.description.abstractThis paper examines the use of a business simulation game to test its effectiveness in promoting the awareness of employability skills in undergraduate students. A mixed approach using an-online survey tool was used to record student perceptions of how their employability skills were developed across ten courses and three faculties. The survey was conducted before the unit started, and on completion. Key emerging themes show that students demonstrated an increased awareness and development of their employability skills. They acquired and developed their skills by learning how to operate a small business start-up using a business simulation game. This research project was limited to one core unit in the curriculum, and the project is university specific. A cross university research project would add further value to the research project. Students are able to articulate the skills they have acquired and developed thus showing elements of self-awareness. An increase in student’s social capital is likely to enhance their career decisions. This paper will be of value to institutions wishing to evaluate the use of serious business simulation games to embed employability skills into the curriculum.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/315/496en
dc.subjectsimulation gamesen
dc.subjectstudentsen
dc.subjectemployability skillsen
dc.subjectsimulationen
dc.subjectemployabilityen
dc.subjectgamesen
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen
dc.titleTeaching employability skills through simulation gamesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSouthampton Solent Universityen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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