4.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603908
Title:
Anonymity networks and the fragile cyber ecosystem
Authors:
Haughey, Hamish; Epiphaniou, Gregory; al-Khateeb, Haider
Abstract:
It is well known that government agencies have had the capability to eavesdrop on public switched telephone networks for many decades.1 However, with the growing use of the Internet and the increasing technical capabilities of agencies to conduct mass surveillance, an individual's right to privacy is of far greater concern in recent years. The ethical issues surrounding privacy, anonymity and mass-surveillance are complicated, with compelling arguments for and against, due in part to the fact that privacy and anonymity are desired by criminals and terrorists, not just individuals who care about their privacy.
Affiliation:
University of Northumbria; University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Haughey, H., Epiphaniou, G., al-Khateeb, H. M. (2016), ‘Anonymity networks and the fragile cyber ecosystem’, Network Security, 2016 (3) 10-18, doi:10.1016/S1353-4858(16)30028-9.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Network Security
Issue Date:
Mar-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603908
DOI:
10.1016/S1353-4858(16)30028-9
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1353485816300289
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1353-4858
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Research in Distributed Technologies (CREDIT)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHaughey, Hamishen
dc.contributor.authorEpiphaniou, Gregoryen
dc.contributor.authoral-Khateeb, Haideren
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-29T13:53:48Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-29T13:53:48Zen
dc.date.issued2016-03en
dc.identifier.citationHaughey, H., Epiphaniou, G., al-Khateeb, H. M. (2016), ‘Anonymity networks and the fragile cyber ecosystem’, Network Security, 2016 (3) 10-18, doi:10.1016/S1353-4858(16)30028-9.en
dc.identifier.issn1353-4858en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S1353-4858(16)30028-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/603908en
dc.description.abstractIt is well known that government agencies have had the capability to eavesdrop on public switched telephone networks for many decades.1 However, with the growing use of the Internet and the increasing technical capabilities of agencies to conduct mass surveillance, an individual's right to privacy is of far greater concern in recent years. The ethical issues surrounding privacy, anonymity and mass-surveillance are complicated, with compelling arguments for and against, due in part to the fact that privacy and anonymity are desired by criminals and terrorists, not just individuals who care about their privacy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1353485816300289en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Network Securityen
dc.subjectanonymityen
dc.subjectToren
dc.subjecti2pen
dc.subjectFreeneten
dc.subjectprivacyen
dc.subjectethicsen
dc.subjectnetwork securityen
dc.subjectG420 Networks and Communicationsen
dc.titleAnonymity networks and the fragile cyber ecosystemen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Northumbriaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalNetwork Securityen
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