2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603547
Title:
Composition and the search for self‐awareness
Authors:
Williams, James D.
Abstract:
Composition studies saw several cogent criticisms of expressivism in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Some scholars assume that those criticisms discredited expressivism in composition studies, ending the focus on assignments that ask students to write personal, supposedly introspective papers that were believed to lead to self‐awareness and self‐identity. Even so, recent research suggests that the expressivist pedagogical orientation is still widely used in writing classes across the US. Joshua Hilst (2012) sought to rehabilitate expressivism by drawing on the work of philosopher Giles Deleuze, arguing that neo‐expressivism provides a palliative to those criticisms. In this regard, Hilst’s analysis follows the current trend of applying Deleuze’s philosophy to a variety of fields. The present analysis therefore consists of two parts, both with pedagogical implications. First, it examines Deleuze’s work and illustrates how his neo‐expressivism and views on writing are incongruent with the expressivism applied in composition studies. Second, it examines the psychological research on introspection and self‐ awareness that has demonstrated with considerable consistency the opacity of mental processes and the difficulty associated with gaining any sense of self‐awareness or self‐identity.
Citation:
Williams, J.D. (2016) 'Composition and the Search for Self‐Awareness' Journal of pedagogic development 6 (1)
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603547
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/256
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, James D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T12:35:59Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-23T12:35:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationWilliams, J.D. (2016) 'Composition and the Search for Self‐Awareness' Journal of pedagogic development 6 (1)en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/603547en
dc.description.abstractComposition studies saw several cogent criticisms of expressivism in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Some scholars assume that those criticisms discredited expressivism in composition studies, ending the focus on assignments that ask students to write personal, supposedly introspective papers that were believed to lead to self‐awareness and self‐identity. Even so, recent research suggests that the expressivist pedagogical orientation is still widely used in writing classes across the US. Joshua Hilst (2012) sought to rehabilitate expressivism by drawing on the work of philosopher Giles Deleuze, arguing that neo‐expressivism provides a palliative to those criticisms. In this regard, Hilst’s analysis follows the current trend of applying Deleuze’s philosophy to a variety of fields. The present analysis therefore consists of two parts, both with pedagogical implications. First, it examines Deleuze’s work and illustrates how his neo‐expressivism and views on writing are incongruent with the expressivism applied in composition studies. Second, it examines the psychological research on introspection and self‐ awareness that has demonstrated with considerable consistency the opacity of mental processes and the difficulty associated with gaining any sense of self‐awareness or self‐identity.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/256en
dc.subjectdeleuzeen
dc.subjectself‐awarenessen
dc.subjectexpressivismen
dc.subjectneo‐expressivismen
dc.subjectself‐identityen
dc.subjectcomposition studiesen
dc.subjectcompositionen
dc.subjectW830 Prose Writingen
dc.titleComposition and the search for self‐awarenessen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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