2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603531
Title:
Nostalgia in Iraq's Post 2003 Drama
Authors:
Witwit, May
Abstract:
Abstract Past and present docu-drama are mostly favoured by Iraqis, yet those tackling topics that were tabooed since Iraq became a republic in July 1958; such as the assassination of the Iraqi royal family, the immigration of Arab Jews and British and German espionage and competition over Iraq, are most popular. These themes are presented through depicting the life-stories of famous singers such as the Iraqi Jewish singer Salima Murad, who refused to immigrate to Israel and remained in the country, and the Iraqi Christian singer Afifa Iskander, who was involved in espionage because of her love story with General Bakr Sidqi, an Iraqi general who in 1936 led a coup d’etat. Both soaps are not much concerned with the social and artistic lives of the singers as they are with the political details. The singers are exploited one way or another and the audience are amazed to watch these previously banned details on TV and at their leisure. The nostalgia for the “good old days” when Iraq enjoyed a nationalist Arab spirit is revived together with the rejection of the colonialist powers, mixing past and present. The romantic atmosphere is also revived, reminding older generations of the times when singers sang of pure love and yearning for the beloved and the difficulty to meet freely. The difficulty to meet in the past can also trigger similar feelings in the younger generations, who are mostly prevented from meeting their loved ones by the daily explosions all over Iraq. This paper explores Nostalgia, as diversely understood and interpreted, both in its relationship to the present and in its political implications. The paper constructs Iraq’s post 2003 drama and its argument, through the discussion of the temporalities of discourse, nostalgia and memory pointed out in Susannah Radstone’s The Sexual Politics of Time (2007) and in Birgite Beumers’ Nikita Mikhalkov: Between Nostalgia and Nationalism (2005).
Citation:
Witwit, M. (2014) 'Nostalgia in Iraq's Post 2003 Drama' 'Future of Nostalgia in the Middle East conference. Held by the University of Copenhagen June 2014
Issue Date:
20-Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/603531
Type:
Conference papers, meetings and proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
Conference paper presented at the 'Future of Nostalgia in the Middle East. Held by the University of Copenhagen June 2014
Sponsors:
Funded by the University of Copenhagen-Leverhulme Trust-The University of Bedfordshire
Appears in Collections:
English Language and Literature

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWitwit, Mayen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T13:45:19Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-23T13:45:19Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06-20en
dc.identifier.citationWitwit, M. (2014) 'Nostalgia in Iraq's Post 2003 Drama' 'Future of Nostalgia in the Middle East conference. Held by the University of Copenhagen June 2014en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/603531en
dc.descriptionConference paper presented at the 'Future of Nostalgia in the Middle East. Held by the University of Copenhagen June 2014en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Past and present docu-drama are mostly favoured by Iraqis, yet those tackling topics that were tabooed since Iraq became a republic in July 1958; such as the assassination of the Iraqi royal family, the immigration of Arab Jews and British and German espionage and competition over Iraq, are most popular. These themes are presented through depicting the life-stories of famous singers such as the Iraqi Jewish singer Salima Murad, who refused to immigrate to Israel and remained in the country, and the Iraqi Christian singer Afifa Iskander, who was involved in espionage because of her love story with General Bakr Sidqi, an Iraqi general who in 1936 led a coup d’etat. Both soaps are not much concerned with the social and artistic lives of the singers as they are with the political details. The singers are exploited one way or another and the audience are amazed to watch these previously banned details on TV and at their leisure. The nostalgia for the “good old days” when Iraq enjoyed a nationalist Arab spirit is revived together with the rejection of the colonialist powers, mixing past and present. The romantic atmosphere is also revived, reminding older generations of the times when singers sang of pure love and yearning for the beloved and the difficulty to meet freely. The difficulty to meet in the past can also trigger similar feelings in the younger generations, who are mostly prevented from meeting their loved ones by the daily explosions all over Iraq. This paper explores Nostalgia, as diversely understood and interpreted, both in its relationship to the present and in its political implications. The paper constructs Iraq’s post 2003 drama and its argument, through the discussion of the temporalities of discourse, nostalgia and memory pointed out in Susannah Radstone’s The Sexual Politics of Time (2007) and in Birgite Beumers’ Nikita Mikhalkov: Between Nostalgia and Nationalism (2005).en
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the University of Copenhagen-Leverhulme Trust-The University of Bedfordshireen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectIraqi migranten
dc.subjectIraqi soap operasen
dc.subjectIraqi dramaen
dc.subjectIraqen
dc.subjectsoap operaen
dc.titleNostalgia in Iraq's Post 2003 Dramaen
dc.typeConference papers, meetings and proceedingsen
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