Identifying and responding to alcohol misuse in memory clinics: current practice, barriers and facilitators

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/601135
Title:
Identifying and responding to alcohol misuse in memory clinics: current practice, barriers and facilitators
Authors:
Thake, Anna; Wadd, Sarah; Edwards, Kim; Randall-James, James
Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore current practice, barriers and facilitators to identifying and responding to alcohol problems in memory clinics. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire sent to professionals in 55 memory clinics in England, Wales and the Isle of Wight and two focus groups with professionals from three memory clinics in England. Findings – Only 1/35 clinics that responded to the questionnaire was using a standardised alcohol screening tool but all attempted to gain some information about alcohol use. Without screening tools, practitioners found it difficult to determine whether alcohol use was problematic. Barriers to identification/intervention included cognitive impairment, service-user being “on guard” during assessment, presence of family members/carers, time constraints and a perception that brief interventions were not within the remit of memory clinics. Facilitators were obtaining visual clues of problem drinking during home visits and collateral information from family members/carers. Research limitations/implications – Focus group participants were recruited through convenience sampling and a small number of professionals took part. This means that the findings may be subject to selection bias and limits the generalisability of the findings. Practical implications – Memory clinics should provide guidance and training for practitioners on how to intervene and respond to alcohol misuse. Further research is required to determine the most effective way to identify alcohol problems in people with cognitive impairment and how to deliver brief alcohol interventions that take account of cognitive deficits. Originality/value – This is the first study to examine alcohol screening and interventions in memory clinics and identifies a need for guidance, training and further research.
Affiliation:
University of Hertfordshire; University of Bedfordshire; South Essex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust; Bedford CMHT for Older People
Citation:
Thake, A., Wadd, S., Edwards, K., Randall-James, J (2015) 'Identifying and responding to alcohol misuse in memory clinics: current practice, barriers and facilitators'. Advances in Dual Diagnosis 8 (2) pp65-77
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Advances in Dual Diagnosis
Issue Date:
18-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/601135
DOI:
10.1108/ADD-09-2014-0031
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ADD-09-2014-0031
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1757-0972
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThake, Annaen
dc.contributor.authorWadd, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Kimen
dc.contributor.authorRandall-James, Jamesen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-10T12:49:44Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-10T12:49:44Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-18en
dc.identifier.citationThake, A., Wadd, S., Edwards, K., Randall-James, J (2015) 'Identifying and responding to alcohol misuse in memory clinics: current practice, barriers and facilitators'. Advances in Dual Diagnosis 8 (2) pp65-77en
dc.identifier.issn1757-0972en
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/ADD-09-2014-0031en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/601135en
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore current practice, barriers and facilitators to identifying and responding to alcohol problems in memory clinics. Design/methodology/approach – A questionnaire sent to professionals in 55 memory clinics in England, Wales and the Isle of Wight and two focus groups with professionals from three memory clinics in England. Findings – Only 1/35 clinics that responded to the questionnaire was using a standardised alcohol screening tool but all attempted to gain some information about alcohol use. Without screening tools, practitioners found it difficult to determine whether alcohol use was problematic. Barriers to identification/intervention included cognitive impairment, service-user being “on guard” during assessment, presence of family members/carers, time constraints and a perception that brief interventions were not within the remit of memory clinics. Facilitators were obtaining visual clues of problem drinking during home visits and collateral information from family members/carers. Research limitations/implications – Focus group participants were recruited through convenience sampling and a small number of professionals took part. This means that the findings may be subject to selection bias and limits the generalisability of the findings. Practical implications – Memory clinics should provide guidance and training for practitioners on how to intervene and respond to alcohol misuse. Further research is required to determine the most effective way to identify alcohol problems in people with cognitive impairment and how to deliver brief alcohol interventions that take account of cognitive deficits. Originality/value – This is the first study to examine alcohol screening and interventions in memory clinics and identifies a need for guidance, training and further research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/ADD-09-2014-0031en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Advances in Dual Diagnosisen
dc.subjectalcoholen
dc.subjectassessmenten
dc.subjectmemoryen
dc.subjectcognitive impairmenten
dc.subjectscreeningen
dc.subjectL510 Health & Welfareen
dc.subjectalcohol misuseen
dc.titleIdentifying and responding to alcohol misuse in memory clinics: current practice, barriers and facilitatorsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Hertfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.contributor.departmentSouth Essex Partnership NHS Foundation Trusten
dc.contributor.departmentBedford CMHT for Older Peopleen
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in Dual Diagnosisen
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