The impact of ‘being assessed’ by a disabled children's team: a personal reflective account

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600899
Title:
The impact of ‘being assessed’ by a disabled children's team: a personal reflective account
Authors:
Wilkins, David ( 0000-0003-2780-0385 )
Abstract:
The body of ‘service user’ literature confirms the value of parental perceptions of child and family social work and the insight parents and others can offer. This paper lends my voice to the literature regarding parental perceptions, inspired by the work of Pamela Davies, who provided a personal account of the impact of a child protection investigation. This paper draws upon my experiences of being a father of two ‘disabled children’ and undergoing an assessment of need. This paper seeks to draw attention to issues of choice, power imbalances and the role of expertise. My personal experience of undergoing an assessment was that it was an emotionally fraught process, for the duration of the assessment, our family stress increased and we had a sense of having to ‘battle’ for the support we needed. As such, my personal experience fits well with the wider body of literature, which highlights the increased stress of caring for children with additional needs, the challenges of ‘fitting’ disabled children into the frameworks used to assess all children and the difficulty for parents and professionals in distinguishing between ‘normal’ parenting responsibilities and the additional responsibilities of caring for a disabled child.
Citation:
Wilkins, D. (2015) 'The impact of ‘being assessed’ by a disabled children's team: a personal reflective accoun't Child & Family Social Work 20 (1):10
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Child & Family Social Work
Issue Date:
Feb-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600899
DOI:
10.1111/cfs.12026
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cfs.12026
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1356-7500
Appears in Collections:
Social Work, Professional Practice and the Law

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilkins, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T13:52:28Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T13:52:28Zen
dc.date.issued2015-02en
dc.identifier.citationWilkins, D. (2015) 'The impact of ‘being assessed’ by a disabled children's team: a personal reflective accoun't Child & Family Social Work 20 (1):10en
dc.identifier.issn1356-7500en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/cfs.12026en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/600899en
dc.description.abstractThe body of ‘service user’ literature confirms the value of parental perceptions of child and family social work and the insight parents and others can offer. This paper lends my voice to the literature regarding parental perceptions, inspired by the work of Pamela Davies, who provided a personal account of the impact of a child protection investigation. This paper draws upon my experiences of being a father of two ‘disabled children’ and undergoing an assessment of need. This paper seeks to draw attention to issues of choice, power imbalances and the role of expertise. My personal experience of undergoing an assessment was that it was an emotionally fraught process, for the duration of the assessment, our family stress increased and we had a sense of having to ‘battle’ for the support we needed. As such, my personal experience fits well with the wider body of literature, which highlights the increased stress of caring for children with additional needs, the challenges of ‘fitting’ disabled children into the frameworks used to assess all children and the difficulty for parents and professionals in distinguishing between ‘normal’ parenting responsibilities and the additional responsibilities of caring for a disabled child.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/cfs.12026en
dc.subjectchildren in needen
dc.subjectdisabilitiesen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectspecial needsen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.subjectuser experienceen
dc.titleThe impact of ‘being assessed’ by a disabled children's team: a personal reflective accounten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalChild & Family Social Worken
dc.contributor.institutionLondon Borough of Enfielden
All Items in UOBREP are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.