2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600879
Title:
Child maltreatment: how can friends contribute to safety?
Authors:
Allnock, Debra
Abstract:
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a study of support received by 60 young adults who experienced sexual, physical or emotional abuse and neglect in childhood. It is focussed on the support provided by friends in particular, and draws out relevant learning for child sexual exploitation (CSE). Design/methodology/approach – In all, 60 young people completed a questionnaire, complemented by a two hour follow-up interview to explore experiences of formal and informal support in disclosing abuse. In total, 13 young people were recruited on the basis of their prior participation in a larger, associated study of child abuse and neglect, with the remainder recruited via open invitation. Findings – There is rich information in the interviews about the ways that friends provided support to participants. Friends provided practical, moral and emotional support. They intervened to keep their friends safe. They offered emotional “escape” and a conduit to adults who could help keep them safe. Importantly, friends recognised that participants were in distress even when they did not know the participants were being abused. Practical implications – The results highlight that friends have a crucial role to play in helping children to keep safe and to feel safe, provided that they are equipped with information and knowledge of how to respond and where to seek help. Originality/value – The paper is original in considering the role of friends within a community safety framework. In addition, the study sample is larger than other studies of its kind, and considers a wider variety of child maltreatment experiences than previous studies, making clear links to CSE.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Allnock, D. (2015) 'Child maltreatment: how can friends contribute to safety?' Safer Communities 14 (1):27
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Safer Communities
Issue Date:
12-Jan-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600879
DOI:
10.1108/SC-02-2015-0005
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/SC-02-2015-0005
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1757-8043
Sponsors:
The research was fully funded by and carried out on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (the NSPCC) as part of the author’s responsibilities when she was employed by the organisation.
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllnock, Debraen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T11:21:12Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T11:21:12Zen
dc.date.issued2015-01-12en
dc.identifier.citationAllnock, D. (2015) 'Child maltreatment: how can friends contribute to safety?' Safer Communities 14 (1):27en
dc.identifier.issn1757-8043en
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/SC-02-2015-0005en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/600879en
dc.description.abstractPurpose – The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of a study of support received by 60 young adults who experienced sexual, physical or emotional abuse and neglect in childhood. It is focussed on the support provided by friends in particular, and draws out relevant learning for child sexual exploitation (CSE). Design/methodology/approach – In all, 60 young people completed a questionnaire, complemented by a two hour follow-up interview to explore experiences of formal and informal support in disclosing abuse. In total, 13 young people were recruited on the basis of their prior participation in a larger, associated study of child abuse and neglect, with the remainder recruited via open invitation. Findings – There is rich information in the interviews about the ways that friends provided support to participants. Friends provided practical, moral and emotional support. They intervened to keep their friends safe. They offered emotional “escape” and a conduit to adults who could help keep them safe. Importantly, friends recognised that participants were in distress even when they did not know the participants were being abused. Practical implications – The results highlight that friends have a crucial role to play in helping children to keep safe and to feel safe, provided that they are equipped with information and knowledge of how to respond and where to seek help. Originality/value – The paper is original in considering the role of friends within a community safety framework. In addition, the study sample is larger than other studies of its kind, and considers a wider variety of child maltreatment experiences than previous studies, making clear links to CSE.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research was fully funded by and carried out on behalf of the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (the NSPCC) as part of the author’s responsibilities when she was employed by the organisation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/doi/abs/10.1108/SC-02-2015-0005en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Safer Communitiesen
dc.rightsAn error occurred on the license name.*
dc.rights.uriAn error occurred getting the license - uri.*
dc.subjectchild abuseen
dc.subjectdisclosureen
dc.subjectchild sexual exploitationen
dc.subjectfriendsen
dc.subjecthelp-seekingen
dc.subjectpeersen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.titleChild maltreatment: how can friends contribute to safety?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalSafer Communitiesen
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