2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600875
Title:
No one noticed, no one heard: a study of disclosures of childhood abuse
Authors:
Allnock, Debra; Miller, Pam
Abstract:
This report describes the childhood experiences of abuse of 60 young men and women and how they disclosed this abuse and sought help. These young people experienced high levels and different kinds of violence, including sexual abuse and family violence. It is often asserted that young people who experience abuse do not talk about it. The face to face interviews for this study show that a majority of young people did attempt to disclose their abuse to at least one person although this information was not identified in the surveys for this study. Eighty per cent – 48 of the 60 young people we spoke to – attempted to disclose the abuse before they were 18 years old. Some of these disclosures led to protective action and some did not. Research has suggested that sexual abuse is unlikely to be disclosed – and yet 38 of the 44 young people (86 per cent) who suffered from sexual abuse did disclose during childhood; 66 per cent attempted to disclose when the abuse was happening. However, just like many high profile cases, not all of these disclosures were “heard” or acted upon. Young people generally made more than one disclosure. Of the 203 disclosures in childhood that were made, 117 disclosures (58 per cent) were acted upon by recipients. Suffering from abuse is a distressing experience. It should be no surprise that disclosures that were ignored, denied or badly handled added to the negative experiences of the young people in this study. Policy-makers and people working with children should use the evidence in this report to support better identification of abuse by adults, reduce the barriers to disclosure and to improve the experience of disclosure for young people. Practitioners should particularly consider how they can change their practice to ensure that the experiences of the young people in this report are not repeated
Citation:
Allnock, D., Miller, P. (2013) 'No one noticed, no one heard: a study of disclosures of childhood abuse'. London, NSPCC.
Publisher:
NSPCC
Issue Date:
2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/600875
Additional Links:
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/research-reports/no-one-noticed-no-one-heard-report.pdf
Type:
Other
Language:
en
Description:
Report
Sponsors:
NSPCC
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAllnock, Debraen
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Pamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-08T11:09:43Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-08T11:09:43Zen
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationAllnock, D., Miller, P. (2013) 'No one noticed, no one heard: a study of disclosures of childhood abuse'. London, NSPCC.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/600875en
dc.descriptionReporten
dc.description.abstractThis report describes the childhood experiences of abuse of 60 young men and women and how they disclosed this abuse and sought help. These young people experienced high levels and different kinds of violence, including sexual abuse and family violence. It is often asserted that young people who experience abuse do not talk about it. The face to face interviews for this study show that a majority of young people did attempt to disclose their abuse to at least one person although this information was not identified in the surveys for this study. Eighty per cent – 48 of the 60 young people we spoke to – attempted to disclose the abuse before they were 18 years old. Some of these disclosures led to protective action and some did not. Research has suggested that sexual abuse is unlikely to be disclosed – and yet 38 of the 44 young people (86 per cent) who suffered from sexual abuse did disclose during childhood; 66 per cent attempted to disclose when the abuse was happening. However, just like many high profile cases, not all of these disclosures were “heard” or acted upon. Young people generally made more than one disclosure. Of the 203 disclosures in childhood that were made, 117 disclosures (58 per cent) were acted upon by recipients. Suffering from abuse is a distressing experience. It should be no surprise that disclosures that were ignored, denied or badly handled added to the negative experiences of the young people in this study. Policy-makers and people working with children should use the evidence in this report to support better identification of abuse by adults, reduce the barriers to disclosure and to improve the experience of disclosure for young people. Practitioners should particularly consider how they can change their practice to ensure that the experiences of the young people in this report are not repeateden
dc.description.sponsorshipNSPCCen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNSPCCen
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.nspcc.org.uk/globalassets/documents/research-reports/no-one-noticed-no-one-heard-report.pdfen
dc.subjectL500 Social Worken
dc.subjectchild abuseen
dc.subjectdisclosureen
dc.titleNo one noticed, no one heard: a study of disclosures of childhood abuseen
dc.typeOtheren
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