2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594793
Title:
Are we all online content creators now? Web 2.0 and digital divides
Authors:
Brake, David R. ( 0000-0003-0580-1918 )
Abstract:
Despite considerable interest in online content creation there has been comparatively little academic analysis of the distribution of such practices, both globally and among social groups within countries. Drawing on theoretical frameworks used in digital divide studies, I outline differences in motivation, access, skills, and usage that appear to underlie and perpetuate differences in online content creation practices between social groups. This paper brings together existing studies and new analyses of existing survey datasets. Together they suggest online content creators tend to be from relatively privileged groups and the content of online services based on their contributions may be biased towards what is most interesting or relevant to them. Some implications of these findings for policymakers and researchers are considered.
Citation:
Brake, D.R. (2014) 'Are We All Online Content Creators Now? Web 2.0 and Digital Divides'. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 19 (3):591
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication
Issue Date:
Apr-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594793
DOI:
10.1111/jcc4.12042
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jcc4.12042
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1083-6101
Appears in Collections:
Interactive Media Group

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrake, David R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-26T09:47:42Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-26T09:47:42Zen
dc.date.issued2014-04en
dc.identifier.citationBrake, D.R. (2014) 'Are We All Online Content Creators Now? Web 2.0 and Digital Divides'. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication 19 (3):591en
dc.identifier.issn1083-6101en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jcc4.12042en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594793en
dc.description.abstractDespite considerable interest in online content creation there has been comparatively little academic analysis of the distribution of such practices, both globally and among social groups within countries. Drawing on theoretical frameworks used in digital divide studies, I outline differences in motivation, access, skills, and usage that appear to underlie and perpetuate differences in online content creation practices between social groups. This paper brings together existing studies and new analyses of existing survey datasets. Together they suggest online content creators tend to be from relatively privileged groups and the content of online services based on their contributions may be biased towards what is most interesting or relevant to them. Some implications of these findings for policymakers and researchers are considered.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/jcc4.12042en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Computer-Mediated Communicationen
dc.subjectprosumeren
dc.subjectproduseren
dc.subjectdigital divideen
dc.subjectparticipation divideen
dc.subjectconvergence cultureen
dc.subjectdigital literacyen
dc.subjectcreativityen
dc.subjectweb 2.0en
dc.subjectWikipediaen
dc.subjectself expressionen
dc.subjectcitizen journalismen
dc.titleAre we all online content creators now? Web 2.0 and digital dividesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Computer-Mediated Communicationen
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