2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594762
Title:
Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrasound for hepatic fat quantification
Authors:
Mehta, Sanjeev R.; Louise Thomas, Elizabeth; Patel, Nayna; Crofton, Mary E.; McCarthy, John; Eliahoo, Joseph; Morin, Stanislas X.; Fitzpatrick, Julie; Durighel, Giuliana; Goldstone, Anthony P. ( 0000-0001-8179-7071 ) ; Johnston, Desmond G.; Bell, Jimmy D. ( 0000-0003-3804-1281 ) ; Taylor-Robinson, Simon D.
Abstract:
Aim:  The increasing prevalence of fatty liver disease requires routine assessment methods. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is increasingly used for steatosis measurement, but due to cost, is unlikely to become a widely-used screening tool. Ultrasound is cheaper and more widely available, although subject to observer variability. Our aim was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound against 1H MRS, using MRS as a gold standard, for the detection and quantification of hepatic fat content. Methods:  Fifty adults participated (43 men, seven women) in this study. Hepatic steatosis was assessed by ultrasound and 1H MRS. Images were graded by two independent radiologists to classify severity and distribution of liver fat. Results:  Ultrasound detected liver fat infiltration in 82% of cases measurable by 1H MRS, while liver fat was detectable in 44% of cases graded absent by ultrasound. Ultrasound grading was subjective, with the radiologists in agreement in 53% of cases (κ = 0.39, P = 0.002). Considerable overlap in intrahepatocellular lipid content was observed between different grades: absent (0.0–1.58%), mild (2.2–16.2%), moderate (4.9–26.7%) and severe (8.1–76.8%) steatosis. Ultrasound could not detect liver fat levels below 2% as measured by 1H MRS Conclusion:  Ultrasound is less sensitive than 1H MRS in detecting very low levels of liver fat content, but is sensitive to fatty infiltration greater than 2%. There is a tendency of higher ultrasound grades to correlate with higher degrees of fatty infiltration, although some overlap exists. Our findings are still consistent with ultrasound being useful as a low cost screening tool.
Affiliation:
Hammersmith Hospital
Citation:
Mehta, S.R. et al (2010) 'Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrasound for hepatic fat quantification'. Hepatology Research 40 (4):399
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Hepatology Research
Issue Date:
Apr-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594762
DOI:
10.1111/j.1872-034X.2009.00620.x
PubMed ID:
20236356
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1872-034X.2009.00620.x
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1386-6346; 1872-034X
Appears in Collections:
Muscle Cellular and Molecular Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMehta, Sanjeev R.en
dc.contributor.authorLouise Thomas, Elizabethen
dc.contributor.authorPatel, Naynaen
dc.contributor.authorCrofton, Mary E.en
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorEliahoo, Josephen
dc.contributor.authorMorin, Stanislas X.en
dc.contributor.authorFitzpatrick, Julieen
dc.contributor.authorDurighel, Giulianaen
dc.contributor.authorGoldstone, Anthony P.en
dc.contributor.authorJohnston, Desmond G.en
dc.contributor.authorBell, Jimmy D.en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor-Robinson, Simon D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-25T10:25:20Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-25T10:25:20Zen
dc.date.issued2010-04en
dc.identifier.citationMehta, S.R. et al (2010) 'Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrasound for hepatic fat quantification'. Hepatology Research 40 (4):399en
dc.identifier.issn1386-6346en
dc.identifier.issn1872-034Xen
dc.identifier.pmid20236356en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1872-034X.2009.00620.xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594762en
dc.description.abstractAim:  The increasing prevalence of fatty liver disease requires routine assessment methods. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) is increasingly used for steatosis measurement, but due to cost, is unlikely to become a widely-used screening tool. Ultrasound is cheaper and more widely available, although subject to observer variability. Our aim was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound against 1H MRS, using MRS as a gold standard, for the detection and quantification of hepatic fat content. Methods:  Fifty adults participated (43 men, seven women) in this study. Hepatic steatosis was assessed by ultrasound and 1H MRS. Images were graded by two independent radiologists to classify severity and distribution of liver fat. Results:  Ultrasound detected liver fat infiltration in 82% of cases measurable by 1H MRS, while liver fat was detectable in 44% of cases graded absent by ultrasound. Ultrasound grading was subjective, with the radiologists in agreement in 53% of cases (κ = 0.39, P = 0.002). Considerable overlap in intrahepatocellular lipid content was observed between different grades: absent (0.0–1.58%), mild (2.2–16.2%), moderate (4.9–26.7%) and severe (8.1–76.8%) steatosis. Ultrasound could not detect liver fat levels below 2% as measured by 1H MRS Conclusion:  Ultrasound is less sensitive than 1H MRS in detecting very low levels of liver fat content, but is sensitive to fatty infiltration greater than 2%. There is a tendency of higher ultrasound grades to correlate with higher degrees of fatty infiltration, although some overlap exists. Our findings are still consistent with ultrasound being useful as a low cost screening tool.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1111/j.1872-034X.2009.00620.xen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Hepatology Researchen
dc.subjectfatty liver diseaseen
dc.subjectproton magnetic resonance spectroscopyen
dc.subjecthepatic faten
dc.titleProton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and ultrasound for hepatic fat quantificationen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHammersmith Hospitalen
dc.identifier.journalHepatology Researchen

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