An elevation of resting metabolic rate with declining health in nonagenarians may be associated with decreased muscle mass and function in women and men, respectively.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594600
Title:
An elevation of resting metabolic rate with declining health in nonagenarians may be associated with decreased muscle mass and function in women and men, respectively.
Authors:
Kim, Sangkyu; Welsh, David A.; Ravussin, Eric; Welsch, Michael A.; Cherry, Katie E.; Myers, Leann; Jazwinski, S. Michal
Abstract:
Previously, we showed that FI34, a frailty index based on 34 health and function ability variables, is heritable and a reliable phenotypic indicator of healthy aging. We have now examined the relationship between major components of energy expenditure and the FI34 in participants of the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study. Resting metabolic rate was associated with FI34, even after adjustment for fat-free mass, fat mass, age, sex, thyroid hormones, and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels, in multiple regression analyses. In contrast, there was no association between total daily energy expenditure and FI34. Circulating creatine phosphokinase, a clinical marker of muscle damage, was also significantly associated with FI34. However, these associations of resting metabolic rate with FI34 were restricted to the oldest old (≥90 years) and absent in younger age groups. In oldest old men, the association of FI34 with creatine phosphokinase persisted, whereas in the oldest old women, only the association with resting metabolic rate pertained with the appearance of an effect of body size and composition. These results point toward an increasing metabolic burden for the maintenance of homeodynamics as health declines in nonagenarians, and this has implications for contraction of metabolic reserve that may potentially accelerate the path to disability.
Affiliation:
Tulane University Health Sciences Center; Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center; Pennington Biomedical Research Center; Louisiana State University
Citation:
Kim, S. et al (2014) 'An elevation of resting metabolic rate with declining health in nonagenarians may be associated with decreased muscle mass and function in women and men, respectively' J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 69 (6):650-6
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
Issue Date:
Jun-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594600
DOI:
10.1093/gerona/glt150
PubMed ID:
24162336
PubMed Central ID:
PMC4022095
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4022095/; http://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/6/650.short
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1758-535X
Appears in Collections:
Applied Sport and Exercise Physiology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKim, Sangkyuen
dc.contributor.authorWelsh, David A.en
dc.contributor.authorRavussin, Ericen
dc.contributor.authorWelsch, Michael A.en
dc.contributor.authorCherry, Katie E.en
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Leannen
dc.contributor.authorJazwinski, S. Michalen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-22T13:35:24Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-22T13:35:24Zen
dc.date.issued2014-06en
dc.identifier.citationKim, S. et al (2014) 'An elevation of resting metabolic rate with declining health in nonagenarians may be associated with decreased muscle mass and function in women and men, respectively' J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci. 69 (6):650-6en
dc.identifier.issn1758-535Xen
dc.identifier.pmid24162336en
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/gerona/glt150en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594600en
dc.description.abstractPreviously, we showed that FI34, a frailty index based on 34 health and function ability variables, is heritable and a reliable phenotypic indicator of healthy aging. We have now examined the relationship between major components of energy expenditure and the FI34 in participants of the Louisiana Healthy Aging Study. Resting metabolic rate was associated with FI34, even after adjustment for fat-free mass, fat mass, age, sex, thyroid hormones, and insulin-like growth factor 1 levels, in multiple regression analyses. In contrast, there was no association between total daily energy expenditure and FI34. Circulating creatine phosphokinase, a clinical marker of muscle damage, was also significantly associated with FI34. However, these associations of resting metabolic rate with FI34 were restricted to the oldest old (≥90 years) and absent in younger age groups. In oldest old men, the association of FI34 with creatine phosphokinase persisted, whereas in the oldest old women, only the association with resting metabolic rate pertained with the appearance of an effect of body size and composition. These results point toward an increasing metabolic burden for the maintenance of homeodynamics as health declines in nonagenarians, and this has implications for contraction of metabolic reserve that may potentially accelerate the path to disability.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4022095/en
dc.relation.urlhttp://biomedgerontology.oxfordjournals.org/content/69/6/650.shorten
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciencesen
dc.subjectageen
dc.subjectagingen
dc.subjectenergy metabolismen
dc.subjectfrailtyen
dc.subjectageingen
dc.subject.meshActivities of Daily Livingen
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAgingen
dc.subject.meshBasal Metabolismen
dc.subject.meshBody Mass Indexen
dc.subject.meshEnergy Metabolismen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subject.meshResten
dc.subject.meshSarcopeniaen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titleAn elevation of resting metabolic rate with declining health in nonagenarians may be associated with decreased muscle mass and function in women and men, respectively.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTulane University Health Sciences Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentLouisiana State University Health Sciences Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentPennington Biomedical Research Centeren
dc.contributor.departmentLouisiana State Universityen
dc.identifier.journalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciencesen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC4022095en

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