Surviving, coping or thriving? understanding coping and its impact on social well-being in Mozambique

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594550
Title:
Surviving, coping or thriving? understanding coping and its impact on social well-being in Mozambique
Authors:
Hutchinson, Aisha ( 0000-0002-5474-676X )
Abstract:
This paper presents the empirical interrogation and development of the concept of coping strategies through the findings of a piece of qualitative research which used this concept to understand and promote social well-being with young women in Mozambique during unintended pregnancy. Concepts and theories of ‘coping’ during adverse life events or periods of stress can be used to reinforce capabilities and strengths, facilitating rather than constraining people's own mechanisms of resilience. However, the framework within which the concept is situated is frequently ill-defined, particularly in applied contexts. ‘Coping strategies’ are used in many models of social work practice (preventative, remedial, rehabilitative, strengths-based, recovery-ordinated, developmental), yet understandings of what it means to ‘cope’, whether it be about counter-balancing threat, ‘getting by’ or ‘getting on’, and how such coping is strategic, are crucial for determining how the concept is used by practitioners and policy makers. Research findings based on qualitative interviews with young women (fifteen to nineteen-year-olds) and key informants in Mozambique on the concept of coping strategies are used to develop a typology which will help academics, policy makers and practitioners unpick the underlying assumptions associated with the concept.
Affiliation:
University of Southampton
Citation:
Hutchinson, A.J. (2012) 'Surviving, Coping or Thriving? Understanding Coping and Its Impact on Social Well-Being in Mozambique' British Journal of Social Work 44 (4):972
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
30-Oct-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594550
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bcs167
Additional Links:
http://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcs167
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0045-3102; 1468-263X
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHutchinson, Aishaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-22T10:49:34Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-22T10:49:34Zen
dc.date.issued2012-10-30en
dc.identifier.citationHutchinson, A.J. (2012) 'Surviving, Coping or Thriving? Understanding Coping and Its Impact on Social Well-Being in Mozambique' British Journal of Social Work 44 (4):972en
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102en
dc.identifier.issn1468-263Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcs167en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594550en
dc.description.abstractThis paper presents the empirical interrogation and development of the concept of coping strategies through the findings of a piece of qualitative research which used this concept to understand and promote social well-being with young women in Mozambique during unintended pregnancy. Concepts and theories of ‘coping’ during adverse life events or periods of stress can be used to reinforce capabilities and strengths, facilitating rather than constraining people's own mechanisms of resilience. However, the framework within which the concept is situated is frequently ill-defined, particularly in applied contexts. ‘Coping strategies’ are used in many models of social work practice (preventative, remedial, rehabilitative, strengths-based, recovery-ordinated, developmental), yet understandings of what it means to ‘cope’, whether it be about counter-balancing threat, ‘getting by’ or ‘getting on’, and how such coping is strategic, are crucial for determining how the concept is used by practitioners and policy makers. Research findings based on qualitative interviews with young women (fifteen to nineteen-year-olds) and key informants in Mozambique on the concept of coping strategies are used to develop a typology which will help academics, policy makers and practitioners unpick the underlying assumptions associated with the concept.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://bjsw.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/doi/10.1093/bjsw/bcs167en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to British Journal of Social Worken
dc.subjectinternational social worken
dc.subjectsocial developmenten
dc.subjectmother's copingen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.subjectteenage pregnancyen
dc.subjectMozambiqueen
dc.titleSurviving, coping or thriving? understanding coping and its impact on social well-being in Mozambiqueen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Southamptonen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
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