2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594495
Title:
Practice literate research: turning the tables
Authors:
Fisher, Mike ( 0000-0002-9844-3904 )
Abstract:
In the never-ending dialogue between the study and practice of social work, the relationship between research and practice occupies one of those special places reserved for ancient disputes. Researchers argue that practitioners typically fail to draw on available research, and that practice lacks an evidence base. Practitioners argue that research is often irrelevant to their daily concerns, and that, in any case, they do not have the time or resources to review their practice in the light of evidence. The stand-off is made more stark because those who research practice are rarely the same people as those who practise social work. This paper, from a practising researcher, will walk a little way in the practitioners’ shoes and try to understand practitioners’ reluctance to engage with research. Working from the practitioners’ perspective, the paper will argue that the constant emphasis on developing research literacy among practitioners needs to be matched by the development of practice literacy among researchers. The emphasis here is on practice research, meaning rigorous and systematic investigation that originates in the concerns of practice and develops practice–based solutions. This is distinct from research by practitioners, which may or may not address practice concerns (for more on this distinction, see Shaw 2005).
Affiliation:
Social Care Institute for Excellence
Citation:
Fisher, M. (2011) 'Practice literate research: turning the tables'. Social work and society 9 (1).
Publisher:
University of Duisburg-Essen
Journal:
Social work and society
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594495
Additional Links:
http://socwork.net/sws/article/view/4/16
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1613-8953
Appears in Collections:
Tilda Goldberg Centre for Social Work and Social Care

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFisher, Mikeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-21T13:45:55Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-21T13:45:55Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationFisher, M. (2011) 'Practice literate research: turning the tables'. Social work and society 9 (1).en
dc.identifier.issn1613-8953en
dc.identifier.otherurn:nbn:de:0009-11-29308en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594495en
dc.description.abstractIn the never-ending dialogue between the study and practice of social work, the relationship between research and practice occupies one of those special places reserved for ancient disputes. Researchers argue that practitioners typically fail to draw on available research, and that practice lacks an evidence base. Practitioners argue that research is often irrelevant to their daily concerns, and that, in any case, they do not have the time or resources to review their practice in the light of evidence. The stand-off is made more stark because those who research practice are rarely the same people as those who practise social work. This paper, from a practising researcher, will walk a little way in the practitioners’ shoes and try to understand practitioners’ reluctance to engage with research. Working from the practitioners’ perspective, the paper will argue that the constant emphasis on developing research literacy among practitioners needs to be matched by the development of practice literacy among researchers. The emphasis here is on practice research, meaning rigorous and systematic investigation that originates in the concerns of practice and develops practice–based solutions. This is distinct from research by practitioners, which may or may not address practice concerns (for more on this distinction, see Shaw 2005).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Duisburg-Essenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://socwork.net/sws/article/view/4/16en
dc.subjectresearchen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.titlePractice literate research: turning the tablesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Care Institute for Excellenceen
dc.identifier.journalSocial work and societyen
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