Discursive strategies for navigating the terrain between the sacred and the profane

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594045
Title:
Discursive strategies for navigating the terrain between the sacred and the profane
Authors:
Schwabenland, Christina
Abstract:
Tensions between communities of identity that are framed by a hermeneutics of religion are a significant and growing element in contemporary societies, sometimes leading to violent confrontations. Butler [2009. Frames of War: When Life is Grievable. London: Verso] suggests that the discursive frames we use to influence our understanding of the ‘other’ significantly affect whether that other is deemed worthy of protection or is made vulnerable to violence. Therefore, following Butler, this article investigates the discursive strategies manifested by organizational actors in response to these tensions, and how they ‘work’ to construct alternative ways of framing the ‘other’. Six voluntary organizations situated geographically in three different areas of inter-communal violence; India, Israel/Palestine and Ireland were chosen for the study. Four discursive strategies are identified; erasing religion, ethnicizing religion, accommodating religion and finally, that of re-sacralizing the public sphere. Each is analysed in terms of their different possibilities for recognition and rejection.
Citation:
Schwabenland, C. (2013) 'Discursive strategies for navigating the terrain between the sacred and the profane' Culture and Organization 21 (1):59
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Culture and Organization
Issue Date:
16-Sep-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/594045
DOI:
10.1080/14759551.2013.828724
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14759551.2013.828724
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1475-9551; 1477-2760
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Leadership Innovation (CLI)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSchwabenland, Christinaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-19T12:40:21Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-19T12:40:21Zen
dc.date.issued2013-09-16en
dc.identifier.citationSchwabenland, C. (2013) 'Discursive strategies for navigating the terrain between the sacred and the profane' Culture and Organization 21 (1):59en
dc.identifier.issn1475-9551en
dc.identifier.issn1477-2760en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/14759551.2013.828724en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/594045en
dc.description.abstractTensions between communities of identity that are framed by a hermeneutics of religion are a significant and growing element in contemporary societies, sometimes leading to violent confrontations. Butler [2009. Frames of War: When Life is Grievable. London: Verso] suggests that the discursive frames we use to influence our understanding of the ‘other’ significantly affect whether that other is deemed worthy of protection or is made vulnerable to violence. Therefore, following Butler, this article investigates the discursive strategies manifested by organizational actors in response to these tensions, and how they ‘work’ to construct alternative ways of framing the ‘other’. Six voluntary organizations situated geographically in three different areas of inter-communal violence; India, Israel/Palestine and Ireland were chosen for the study. Four discursive strategies are identified; erasing religion, ethnicizing religion, accommodating religion and finally, that of re-sacralizing the public sphere. Each is analysed in terms of their different possibilities for recognition and rejection.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14759551.2013.828724en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Culture and Organizationen
dc.subjectreligious conflicten
dc.subjectdiscursive strategiesen
dc.subjectsecularizationen
dc.subjectButleren
dc.subjectsubjectivitiesen
dc.titleDiscursive strategies for navigating the terrain between the sacred and the profaneen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalCulture and Organizationen
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