2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593715
Title:
A relational approach to understanding knowing in communities of practice
Authors:
Kakavelakis, Konstantinos
Abstract:
The typology of knowledge communities and knowledge collectivities has aimed to enhance the analytical clarity of the communities of practice concept (CoPs). This is achieved by outlining key differences in the knowing unfolding in CoPs and in less ‘homogeneous’ collectives such as multi-disciplinary project teams. This paper argues that the typology offers an account which denies any significant role to agency within CoPs. Additionally, it explicates the knowledge processes CoPs engage with, by reference to their internal constitution and in isolation from the broader contexts in which they are embedded. To address this limitation the paper employs a relational perspective of agency and context interplay. It reports data from two case studies of CoPs operating within the context of a merger in the UK brewing sector. The evidence reaffirms the significance of agency in CoPs. It also illustrates how the exercise of agency is mediated by performative expectations derived from the positioning of work practices within broader relations of production. The interplay of agency and context poses limitations to the reification of the characteristics of knowing—in terms of the types of knowledge drawn upon and the outcomes of such a process—in different groups.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Kakavelakis, K. (2010) 'A relational approach to understanding knowing in communities of practice' Knowledge and Process Management 17 (4):168
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Knowledge and Process Management
Issue Date:
Oct-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593715
DOI:
10.1002/kpm.354
Additional Links:
http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/kpm.354
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1092-4604
Appears in Collections:
Business and Information Systems Research Centre (BISC)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKakavelakis, Konstantinosen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-18T13:18:27Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-18T13:18:27Zen
dc.date.issued2010-10en
dc.identifier.citationKakavelakis, K. (2010) 'A relational approach to understanding knowing in communities of practice' Knowledge and Process Management 17 (4):168en
dc.identifier.issn1092-4604en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/kpm.354en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593715en
dc.description.abstractThe typology of knowledge communities and knowledge collectivities has aimed to enhance the analytical clarity of the communities of practice concept (CoPs). This is achieved by outlining key differences in the knowing unfolding in CoPs and in less ‘homogeneous’ collectives such as multi-disciplinary project teams. This paper argues that the typology offers an account which denies any significant role to agency within CoPs. Additionally, it explicates the knowledge processes CoPs engage with, by reference to their internal constitution and in isolation from the broader contexts in which they are embedded. To address this limitation the paper employs a relational perspective of agency and context interplay. It reports data from two case studies of CoPs operating within the context of a merger in the UK brewing sector. The evidence reaffirms the significance of agency in CoPs. It also illustrates how the exercise of agency is mediated by performative expectations derived from the positioning of work practices within broader relations of production. The interplay of agency and context poses limitations to the reification of the characteristics of knowing—in terms of the types of knowledge drawn upon and the outcomes of such a process—in different groups.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/kpm.354en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Knowledge and Process Managementen
dc.subjectcommunities of practiceen
dc.subjectknowledgeen
dc.subjectknowingen
dc.titleA relational approach to understanding knowing in communities of practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalKnowledge and Process Managementen
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