The behaviour of young children with social communication disorders during dyadic interaction with peers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593505
Title:
The behaviour of young children with social communication disorders during dyadic interaction with peers
Authors:
Murphy, Suzanne; Faulkner, Dorothy; Farley, Laura R.
Abstract:
Children with social communication disorders are known to experience more problematic peer relations than typically-developing children. However, detailed observation of their behaviour and communication during interaction with peers has not previously been undertaken. Micro-analytic observational methods were used to analyse the audio-taped interaction of children (N = 112) selected from mainstream schools (ages 5-6 years-old) on a computerised dyadic collaborative task. Comparisons were made between children with average-to-high- and low-pragmatic language skill as measured by the Test of Pragmatic Skills. Dyads were composed of an average-to-high-skilled child plus a low-skilled child (32 dyads), or of two average-to-high-skilled children (24 dyads). Consistently with their pragmatic language scores, low-skilled children were more likely to ignore other children's questions and requests than were average-to-high-skilled children. When average-to-high-skilled children worked with low-skilled children, as opposed to with other average-to-high-skilled children, they showed some sensitivity and adaptation to these children's difficulties; they used significantly more directives, clarification and provided more information. However, there was a cost in terms of the emotional tone of these interactions; when working with low-skilled children, the average-to-high-skilled children expressed considerably more negative feelings towards their partners than with another average-to-high-skilled child. In conclusion, observation of the interaction of average-to-high- and low-skilled children suggests promise for peer-assisted interventions and specifies which communicative behaviours could be targeted. However, care should be taken to manage the affective climate of these interactions for the benefit of all children involved.
Citation:
Murphy, S., Faulkner, D., Farley, L. (2014) 'The behaviour of young children with social communication disorders during dyadic interaction with peers' J Abnorm Child Psychol 42 (2):277-89
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of abnormal child psychology
Issue Date:
Feb-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593505
DOI:
10.1007/s10802-013-9772-6
PubMed ID:
23794095
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10802-013-9772-6
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1573-2835
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, Suzanneen
dc.contributor.authorFaulkner, Dorothyen
dc.contributor.authorFarley, Laura R.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-15T10:10:09Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-15T10:10:09Zen
dc.date.issued2014-02en
dc.identifier.citationMurphy, S., Faulkner, D., Farley, L. (2014) 'The behaviour of young children with social communication disorders during dyadic interaction with peers' J Abnorm Child Psychol 42 (2):277-89en
dc.identifier.issn1573-2835en
dc.identifier.pmid23794095en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10802-013-9772-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593505en
dc.description.abstractChildren with social communication disorders are known to experience more problematic peer relations than typically-developing children. However, detailed observation of their behaviour and communication during interaction with peers has not previously been undertaken. Micro-analytic observational methods were used to analyse the audio-taped interaction of children (N = 112) selected from mainstream schools (ages 5-6 years-old) on a computerised dyadic collaborative task. Comparisons were made between children with average-to-high- and low-pragmatic language skill as measured by the Test of Pragmatic Skills. Dyads were composed of an average-to-high-skilled child plus a low-skilled child (32 dyads), or of two average-to-high-skilled children (24 dyads). Consistently with their pragmatic language scores, low-skilled children were more likely to ignore other children's questions and requests than were average-to-high-skilled children. When average-to-high-skilled children worked with low-skilled children, as opposed to with other average-to-high-skilled children, they showed some sensitivity and adaptation to these children's difficulties; they used significantly more directives, clarification and provided more information. However, there was a cost in terms of the emotional tone of these interactions; when working with low-skilled children, the average-to-high-skilled children expressed considerably more negative feelings towards their partners than with another average-to-high-skilled child. In conclusion, observation of the interaction of average-to-high- and low-skilled children suggests promise for peer-assisted interventions and specifies which communicative behaviours could be targeted. However, care should be taken to manage the affective climate of these interactions for the benefit of all children involved.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10802-013-9772-6en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of abnormal child psychologyen
dc.subjectpeer relationsen
dc.subjectpragmatic languageen
dc.subjectperspective-takingen
dc.subjectsocial communication disordersen
dc.subjectmicro-analysisen
dc.subjectcollaborative tasken
dc.subjectcollaborationen
dc.subjectsocial interactionen
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Varianceen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild Behavioren
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCommunicationen
dc.subject.meshCommunication Disordersen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInterpersonal Relationsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPeer Groupen
dc.subject.meshTask Performance and Analysisen
dc.titleThe behaviour of young children with social communication disorders during dyadic interaction with peersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of abnormal child psychologyen
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