Talking about end-of-life care: the perspectives of older South Asians living in East London

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593504
Title:
Talking about end-of-life care: the perspectives of older South Asians living in East London
Authors:
Venkatasalu, Munikumar R.; Arthur, Antony; Seymour, Jane
Abstract:
The National End-of-life Care Strategy for England identifies that a lack of open discussion about death and dying can be a barrier to achieving good quality end-of-life care. South Asians constitute the single largest ethnic minority group in the United Kingdom, yet little is known about their attitudes and expectations towards the discussion of death and dying. In this study, set in East London, five focus groups and 29 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 55 older adults aged between 52 and 78 years. Participants from six South Asian ethnic groups were recruited from 11 local community organisations. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyse the data. Findings revealed two key themes which capture the perspectives of older South Asian study participants towards end-of-life care discussions. The theme ‘avoidance as a cultural norm’ relates to the relative absence of discussions around death and dying experienced by participants. Participants neither expected to have discussions about their own death and dying within their family, nor to assume any involvement in decision-making. The second theme ‘avoidance as protection’ relates to beliefs and experiences about the delegation of decision-making to family members. Future research should explore the perspectives of second-generation adult children towards end-of-life care discussions.
Affiliation:
Northumbria University; University of East Anglia; University of Nottingham
Citation:
Venkatasalu, M.R., Arthur, A., Seymour, J. (2013) 'Talking about end-of-life care: the perspectives of older South Asians living in East London' Journal of Research in Nursing 18 (5):394
Publisher:
SAGE
Journal:
Journal of Research in Nursing
Issue Date:
2-Jul-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593504
DOI:
10.1177/1744987113490712
Additional Links:
http://jrn.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1744987113490712
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1744-9871; 1744-988X
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorVenkatasalu, Munikumar R.en
dc.contributor.authorArthur, Antonyen
dc.contributor.authorSeymour, Janeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-15T10:03:26Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-15T10:03:26Zen
dc.date.issued2013-07-02en
dc.identifier.citationVenkatasalu, M.R., Arthur, A., Seymour, J. (2013) 'Talking about end-of-life care: the perspectives of older South Asians living in East London' Journal of Research in Nursing 18 (5):394en
dc.identifier.issn1744-9871en
dc.identifier.issn1744-988Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1744987113490712en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593504en
dc.description.abstractThe National End-of-life Care Strategy for England identifies that a lack of open discussion about death and dying can be a barrier to achieving good quality end-of-life care. South Asians constitute the single largest ethnic minority group in the United Kingdom, yet little is known about their attitudes and expectations towards the discussion of death and dying. In this study, set in East London, five focus groups and 29 in-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a total of 55 older adults aged between 52 and 78 years. Participants from six South Asian ethnic groups were recruited from 11 local community organisations. A constructivist grounded theory approach was used to analyse the data. Findings revealed two key themes which capture the perspectives of older South Asian study participants towards end-of-life care discussions. The theme ‘avoidance as a cultural norm’ relates to the relative absence of discussions around death and dying experienced by participants. Participants neither expected to have discussions about their own death and dying within their family, nor to assume any involvement in decision-making. The second theme ‘avoidance as protection’ relates to beliefs and experiences about the delegation of decision-making to family members. Future research should explore the perspectives of second-generation adult children towards end-of-life care discussions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://jrn.sagepub.com/cgi/doi/10.1177/1744987113490712en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of Research in Nursingen
dc.subjectadvance care planningen
dc.subjectminority ethnicen
dc.subjectend-of-life careen
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectSouth Asiansen
dc.subjectdeath and dyingen
dc.titleTalking about end-of-life care: the perspectives of older South Asians living in East Londonen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorthumbria Universityen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of East Angliaen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Nottinghamen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Research in Nursingen
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