Black families’ perceptions of barriers to the practice of a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative study in the UK

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593441
Title:
Black families’ perceptions of barriers to the practice of a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative study in the UK
Authors:
Ochieng, Bertha
Abstract:
While studies have focused on tangible indicators of the practice of healthy lifestyles, there remains a dearth of research exploring the inter-relationships between the practice of healthy lifestyles and the prevailing living circumstances of Black and other visible minority ethnic communities in Western societies. This article presents an account of African Caribbean men and women's beliefs and perceptions about the barriers of practising a healthy lifestyle, focusing specifically on the effects of social exclusion, racism and ethnic identity. A total of 18 participants from the north of England participated in the study, with in-depth interviews conducted in their homes. The participants believed that principles of healthy lifestyles were largely not relevant to their lived experiences because they failed to take into account their experiences of racism, social exclusion, ethnic identity, values and beliefs. Indeed, participants argued that, with their emphasis on illness prevention and perceived Eurocentric approaches, the principles of healthy lifestyle were part of the social exclusion paradigm experienced by their community. The study concludes by suggesting that it is essential to place notions of socio-economic disadvantage, discrimination, marginalisation and racism at the centre rather than the periphery when considering strategies to make healthier choices an easier option for Black and other visible minority ethnic communities.
Citation:
Ochieng, B. (2011) 'Black families’ perceptions of barriers to the practice of a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative study in the UK' Critical public health 23 (1)
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Critical public health
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593441
DOI:
10.1080/09581596.2011.610438
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09581596.2011.610438
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0958-1596
EISSN:
1469-3682
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOchieng, Berthaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T11:26:27Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-14T11:26:27Zen
dc.date.issued2011en
dc.identifier.citationOchieng, B. (2011) 'Black families’ perceptions of barriers to the practice of a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative study in the UK' Critical public health 23 (1)en
dc.identifier.issn0958-1596en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/09581596.2011.610438en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593441en
dc.description.abstractWhile studies have focused on tangible indicators of the practice of healthy lifestyles, there remains a dearth of research exploring the inter-relationships between the practice of healthy lifestyles and the prevailing living circumstances of Black and other visible minority ethnic communities in Western societies. This article presents an account of African Caribbean men and women's beliefs and perceptions about the barriers of practising a healthy lifestyle, focusing specifically on the effects of social exclusion, racism and ethnic identity. A total of 18 participants from the north of England participated in the study, with in-depth interviews conducted in their homes. The participants believed that principles of healthy lifestyles were largely not relevant to their lived experiences because they failed to take into account their experiences of racism, social exclusion, ethnic identity, values and beliefs. Indeed, participants argued that, with their emphasis on illness prevention and perceived Eurocentric approaches, the principles of healthy lifestyle were part of the social exclusion paradigm experienced by their community. The study concludes by suggesting that it is essential to place notions of socio-economic disadvantage, discrimination, marginalisation and racism at the centre rather than the periphery when considering strategies to make healthier choices an easier option for Black and other visible minority ethnic communities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09581596.2011.610438en
dc.subjectAfrican Caribbeanen
dc.subjectethnicityen
dc.subjectethnic identityen
dc.subjecthealthy lifestylesen
dc.subjectinterviewingen
dc.subjectracismen
dc.titleBlack families’ perceptions of barriers to the practice of a healthy lifestyle: a qualitative study in the UKen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1469-3682en
dc.identifier.journalCritical public healthen
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