An examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdom

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593437
Title:
An examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Randhawa, Gurch ( 0000-0002-2289-5859 ) ; Wilkinson, Emma
Abstract:
The Care Pathway project used a multilevel and multimethod approach to explore access to the care pathway for diabetic renal disease. Taking what was known about the outcomes of ethnic minority patients with diabetic renal disease; the study sought to explore and further understand how and why South Asian patients’ experiences may be different from the majority of population in relation to access. Through improved understanding of any observed inequalities, the study aimed to inform the development of culturally competent diabetes services. The design incorporated audits of patient indicators for diabetes and renal health at key points in the pathway: Diagnosis of diabetes and referral to specialist renal services in two years- 2004 and 2007, and qualitative individual interviews with patients and providers identified through the 2007 samples. This article describes the care provider perspective of access to diabetes care from a thematic analysis of 14 semistructured interviews conducted with professionals, at three study sites, with different roles in the diabetes pathway. National policy level initiatives to improve quality have been mirrored by quality improvements at the local practice level. These achievements, however, have been unable to address all aspects of care that service providers identified as important in facilitating access to all patient groups. Concordance emerged as a key process in improving access to care within the pathway system, and barriers to this exist at different levels and are greater for South Asian patients compared to White patients. A conceptual model of concordance as a process through which access to quality diabetes care is achieved and its relation to cultural competency is put forward. The effort required to achieve access and concordance among South Asian patients is inversely related to cultural competency at policy and practice levels. These processes are underpinned by communication.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Randhawa, G., Wilkinson, E. (2012) 'An examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdom' Indian Journal of Nephrology 22 (6):424
Publisher:
Medknow Publications
Journal:
Indian Journal of Nephrology
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/593437
DOI:
10.4103/0971-4065.106033
PubMed Central ID:
PMC3573483
Additional Links:
http://www.indianjnephrol.org/text.asp?2012/22/6/424/106033
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
0971-4065
Appears in Collections:
IHR Institute for Health Research

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRandhawa, Gurchen
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, Emmaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T11:00:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-14T11:00:18Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationRandhawa, G., Wilkinson, E. (2012) 'An examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdom' Indian Journal of Nephrology 22 (6):424en
dc.identifier.issn0971-4065en
dc.identifier.doi10.4103/0971-4065.106033en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/593437en
dc.description.abstractThe Care Pathway project used a multilevel and multimethod approach to explore access to the care pathway for diabetic renal disease. Taking what was known about the outcomes of ethnic minority patients with diabetic renal disease; the study sought to explore and further understand how and why South Asian patients’ experiences may be different from the majority of population in relation to access. Through improved understanding of any observed inequalities, the study aimed to inform the development of culturally competent diabetes services. The design incorporated audits of patient indicators for diabetes and renal health at key points in the pathway: Diagnosis of diabetes and referral to specialist renal services in two years- 2004 and 2007, and qualitative individual interviews with patients and providers identified through the 2007 samples. This article describes the care provider perspective of access to diabetes care from a thematic analysis of 14 semistructured interviews conducted with professionals, at three study sites, with different roles in the diabetes pathway. National policy level initiatives to improve quality have been mirrored by quality improvements at the local practice level. These achievements, however, have been unable to address all aspects of care that service providers identified as important in facilitating access to all patient groups. Concordance emerged as a key process in improving access to care within the pathway system, and barriers to this exist at different levels and are greater for South Asian patients compared to White patients. A conceptual model of concordance as a process through which access to quality diabetes care is achieved and its relation to cultural competency is put forward. The effort required to achieve access and concordance among South Asian patients is inversely related to cultural competency at policy and practice levels. These processes are underpinned by communication.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedknow Publicationsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.indianjnephrol.org/text.asp?2012/22/6/424/106033en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Indian Journal of Nephrologyen
dc.subjectconcordanceen
dc.subjectcultural competenceen
dc.subjectdiabetesen
dc.titleAn examination of concordance and cultural competency in the diabetes care pathway: South Asians living in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalIndian Journal of Nephrologyen
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC3573483en
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