Effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction in an academic literacy writing course at the University of Botswana

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/584269
Title:
Effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction in an academic literacy writing course at the University of Botswana
Authors:
Ntereke, Beauty B.; Ramoroka, Boitumelo T.
Abstract:
The purpose of this paper is to report on the University of Botswana undergraduate students’ and lecturers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction given in Communication and Academic Literacy Skills (COM112) academic writing module. Students (n= 46) and lecturers (n=2) who have taught the course were probed through a questionnaire adapted from (Krause, 2001) on their instruction and assessment of the course. Fifteen (n= 12) Students were also interviewed in a focus group. The data obtained indicated that students and lecturers held different perceptions about the effectiveness of the academic writing activities and instruction. These results have implications for classroom pedagogy in that lecturers need to consider the perceptions and needs of students (Nunan, 1989) if they are to fully adopt a learner centred approach to learning and teaching that is suggested by the University of Botswana (UB) Learning and teaching policy (2008).
Affiliation:
University of Botswana
Citation:
Ntereke, B.B., Ramoroka, B.T. (2015) 'Effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction in an academic literacy writing course at the University of Botswana' Journal of pedagogic development 5 (3)
Publisher:
University of Bedfordshire
Journal:
Journal of pedagogic development
Issue Date:
2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/584269
Additional Links:
https://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/229
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2047-3265
Appears in Collections:
Journal of Pedagogic Development

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNtereke, Beauty B.en
dc.contributor.authorRamoroka, Boitumelo T.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T11:06:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-21T11:06:04Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationNtereke, B.B., Ramoroka, B.T. (2015) 'Effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction in an academic literacy writing course at the University of Botswana' Journal of pedagogic development 5 (3)en
dc.identifier.issn2047-3265en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/584269en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this paper is to report on the University of Botswana undergraduate students’ and lecturers’ perceptions of the effectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction given in Communication and Academic Literacy Skills (COM112) academic writing module. Students (n= 46) and lecturers (n=2) who have taught the course were probed through a questionnaire adapted from (Krause, 2001) on their instruction and assessment of the course. Fifteen (n= 12) Students were also interviewed in a focus group. The data obtained indicated that students and lecturers held different perceptions about the effectiveness of the academic writing activities and instruction. These results have implications for classroom pedagogy in that lecturers need to consider the perceptions and needs of students (Nunan, 1989) if they are to fully adopt a learner centred approach to learning and teaching that is suggested by the University of Botswana (UB) Learning and teaching policy (2008).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.relation.urlhttps://journals.beds.ac.uk/ojs/index.php/jpd/article/view/229en
dc.subjectacademic writingen
dc.subjectstudent perceptionsen
dc.subjectfirst year university studentsen
dc.subjectX300 Academic studies in Educationen
dc.titleEffectiveness of academic writing activities and instruction in an academic literacy writing course at the University of Botswanaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Botswanaen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of pedagogic developmenten
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