Breaking up prolonged sitting time with walking does not affect appetite or gut hormone concentrations but does induce an energy deficit and suppresses postprandial glycaemia in sedentary adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/583995
Title:
Breaking up prolonged sitting time with walking does not affect appetite or gut hormone concentrations but does induce an energy deficit and suppresses postprandial glycaemia in sedentary adults
Authors:
Bailey, Daniel Paul ( 0000-0003-3772-630X ) ; Broom, David R.; Chrismas, Bryna C.; Taylor, Lee; Flynn, Edward; Hough, John
Abstract:
Background: Breaking up periods of prolonged sitting can negate harmful metabolic effects but the influence on appetite and gut hormones is not understood and is investigated in this study. Methods: Thirteen sedentary (7 female) participants undertook three, 5 h trials in random order: 1) uninterrupted sitting (SIT), 2) seated with 2 min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20 min (SIT+LA), and 3) seated with 2 min bouts of moderate-intensity walking every 20 min (SIT+MA). A standardised test drink was provided at the start and an ad libitum pasta test meal provided at the end of each trial. Subjective appetite ratings and plasma acylated ghrelin, peptide YY, insulin, and glucose were measured at regular intervals. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for each variable. Results: AUC values for appetite and gut hormone concentrations were unaffected in the activity breaks conditions compared to uninterrupted sitting (linear mixed modelling: p>0.05). Glucose AUC was lower in SIT+MA than SIT+LA (p=0.004) and SIT (p=0.055). There was no difference in absolute ad libitum energy intake between conditions (p>0.05), however, relative energy intake was lower in SIT+LA (39%; p=0.011) and SIT+MA (120%; p<0.001) than SIT. Conclusion: Breaking up prolonged sitting does not alter appetite and gut hormone responses to a meal over a 5 h period. Increased energy expenditure from activity breaks could promote an energy deficit that is not compensated for in a subsequent meal.
Citation:
Bailey, D.P., Broom, D., Chrismas, B.C., Taylor, L., Flynn, E. Hough, J. (2015) 'Breaking up prolonged sitting time with walking does not affect appetite or gut hormone concentrations but does induce an energy deficit and suppresses postprandial glycaemia in sedentary adults' Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 41 (3) 10.1139/apnm-2015-0462
Publisher:
NRC Research Press
Journal:
Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism
Issue Date:
14-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/583995
DOI:
10.1139/apnm-2015-0462
Additional Links:
http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/apnm-2015-0462
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1715-5312; 1715-5320
Appears in Collections:
Physical Activity and Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Daniel Paulen
dc.contributor.authorBroom, David R.en
dc.contributor.authorChrismas, Bryna C.en
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Leeen
dc.contributor.authorFlynn, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorHough, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-16T10:24:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-16T10:24:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-14en
dc.identifier.citationBailey, D.P., Broom, D., Chrismas, B.C., Taylor, L., Flynn, E. Hough, J. (2015) 'Breaking up prolonged sitting time with walking does not affect appetite or gut hormone concentrations but does induce an energy deficit and suppresses postprandial glycaemia in sedentary adults' Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolism 41 (3) 10.1139/apnm-2015-0462en
dc.identifier.issn1715-5312en
dc.identifier.issn1715-5320en
dc.identifier.doi10.1139/apnm-2015-0462en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/583995en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Breaking up periods of prolonged sitting can negate harmful metabolic effects but the influence on appetite and gut hormones is not understood and is investigated in this study. Methods: Thirteen sedentary (7 female) participants undertook three, 5 h trials in random order: 1) uninterrupted sitting (SIT), 2) seated with 2 min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20 min (SIT+LA), and 3) seated with 2 min bouts of moderate-intensity walking every 20 min (SIT+MA). A standardised test drink was provided at the start and an ad libitum pasta test meal provided at the end of each trial. Subjective appetite ratings and plasma acylated ghrelin, peptide YY, insulin, and glucose were measured at regular intervals. Area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for each variable. Results: AUC values for appetite and gut hormone concentrations were unaffected in the activity breaks conditions compared to uninterrupted sitting (linear mixed modelling: p>0.05). Glucose AUC was lower in SIT+MA than SIT+LA (p=0.004) and SIT (p=0.055). There was no difference in absolute ad libitum energy intake between conditions (p>0.05), however, relative energy intake was lower in SIT+LA (39%; p=0.011) and SIT+MA (120%; p<0.001) than SIT. Conclusion: Breaking up prolonged sitting does not alter appetite and gut hormone responses to a meal over a 5 h period. Increased energy expenditure from activity breaks could promote an energy deficit that is not compensated for in a subsequent meal.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNRC Research Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/10.1139/apnm-2015-0462en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Applied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolismen
dc.subjectB120 Physiologyen
dc.subjectsittingen
dc.subjectsedentary behaviouren
dc.subjectappetite-regulating hormonesen
dc.subjectappetiteen
dc.subjectgut hormonesen
dc.titleBreaking up prolonged sitting time with walking does not affect appetite or gut hormone concentrations but does induce an energy deficit and suppresses postprandial glycaemia in sedentary adultsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalApplied Physiology, Nutrition, and Metabolismen
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