Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/582438
Title:
Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not
Authors:
Bailey, Daniel Paul ( 0000-0003-3772-630X ) ; Locke, Christopher D.
Abstract:
Objectives: To explore the effects of breaking up prolonged sitting time with standing or light-intensity walking on a range of cardiometabolic risk markers. Design: A randomised three-period, three-treatment acute crossover trial. Methods: Ten non-obese adults took part in three trials: (1) uninterrupted sitting; (2) seated with 2-min bouts of standing every 20 min; and (3) seated with 2-min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20 min. Two standardised test drinks (total 80.3 carbohydrate, 50 g fat) were provided after an initial 1-h period of uninterrupted sitting. Plasma glucose and blood pressure were assessed hourly to calculate area under the curve. Total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and 5-h. ANOVAs were used to explore between-trial differences. Results: Glucose area under the curve was lower in the activity-break condition compared to the uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions: mean area under the curve 18.5 (95% CI 17, 20), 22.0 (20.5, 23.5), and 22.2 (20.7, 23.7) mmol L/5-h, respectively, p < 0.001; no difference between uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions (p > 0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure area under the curve did not differ significantly between conditions, nor did responses in lipid parameters (p > 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggests that interrupting sitting time with frequent brief bouts of light-intensity activity, but not standing, imparts beneficial postprandial responses that may enhance cardiometabolic health. These findings may have importance in the design of effective interventions to reduce cardiometabolic disease risk.
Affiliation:
University of Bedfordshire
Citation:
Bailey, D.P., Locke, C.D. (2015) 'Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not' Journal of science and medicine in sport, 18 (3):294-8
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Journal of science and medicine in sport / Sports Medicine Australia
Issue Date:
May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10547/582438
DOI:
10.1016/j.jsams.2014.03.008
PubMed ID:
24704421
Additional Links:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24704421; http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1440244014000516
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1878-1861
Appears in Collections:
Physical Activity and Health

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Daniel Paulen
dc.contributor.authorLocke, Christopher D.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-20T11:57:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-20T11:57:20Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05en
dc.identifier.citationBailey, D.P., Locke, C.D. (2015) 'Breaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does not' Journal of science and medicine in sport, 18 (3):294-8en
dc.identifier.issn1878-1861en
dc.identifier.pmid24704421en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.jsams.2014.03.008en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10547/582438en
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To explore the effects of breaking up prolonged sitting time with standing or light-intensity walking on a range of cardiometabolic risk markers. Design: A randomised three-period, three-treatment acute crossover trial. Methods: Ten non-obese adults took part in three trials: (1) uninterrupted sitting; (2) seated with 2-min bouts of standing every 20 min; and (3) seated with 2-min bouts of light-intensity walking every 20 min. Two standardised test drinks (total 80.3 carbohydrate, 50 g fat) were provided after an initial 1-h period of uninterrupted sitting. Plasma glucose and blood pressure were assessed hourly to calculate area under the curve. Total cholesterol, HDL, and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and 5-h. ANOVAs were used to explore between-trial differences. Results: Glucose area under the curve was lower in the activity-break condition compared to the uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions: mean area under the curve 18.5 (95% CI 17, 20), 22.0 (20.5, 23.5), and 22.2 (20.7, 23.7) mmol L/5-h, respectively, p < 0.001; no difference between uninterrupted sitting and standing-break conditions (p > 0.05). Systolic and diastolic blood pressure area under the curve did not differ significantly between conditions, nor did responses in lipid parameters (p > 0.05). Conclusions: This study suggests that interrupting sitting time with frequent brief bouts of light-intensity activity, but not standing, imparts beneficial postprandial responses that may enhance cardiometabolic health. These findings may have importance in the design of effective interventions to reduce cardiometabolic disease risk.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24704421en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1440244014000516en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of science and medicine in sport / Sports Medicine Australiaen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjectblood glucoseen
dc.subjectsedentary lifestyleen
dc.subjectpostprandial perioden
dc.subjectC600 Sports Scienceen
dc.titleBreaking up prolonged sitting with light-intensity walking improves postprandial glycemia, but breaking up sitting with standing does noten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Bedfordshireen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of science and medicine in sport / Sports Medicine Australiaen

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